run its course


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run

1. verb, informal To leave or depart, especially very quickly or suddenly. Sorry, I've got to run. I'll call you tomorrow to go over the project in greater detail. A: "Do you want another drink?" B: "No, I'd better run. I have an early start tomorrow."
2. noun, slang A period of frequent and extended use of a particular drug; a drug binge. Usually used in combinations. It turns out he had been on a cocaine run for nearly three months straight, and he had spent almost all of their savings during that time. I nearly died on that last heroin run. This time, I'm doing whatever it takes to get clean.

run its course

To progress along something's natural course and conclude at its normal pace. (Used especially in reference to illness and disease.) Unfortunately, there's no treatment for this kind of infection. You just have to let it run its course. Don't stress about Susan's new boyfriend. I'm sure it's just a summer thing—it will run its course before she goes back to school. The president said he would rather let the economy run its course than try to manipulate it with a stimulus package.
See also: course, run
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

run its course

[for something] to continue through its cycle of existence, especially a disease. Sorry. There is no medicine for it. It will just have to run its course.
See also: course, run
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

run its course

Proceed to its logical or natural conclusion, as in The doctor said the cold would probably run its course within a week. This idiom employs course in the sense of "an onward movement in a particular path." [Second half of 1500s]
See also: course, run
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

run its course

COMMON If something runs its course, it develops gradually and comes to a natural end. If you allow such behaviour to run its course without reacting, eventually the behaviour will disappear on its own. Is this a sign that the recession has run its course?
See also: course, run
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

run/take its ˈcourse

(of a series of events, an illness, etc.) develop in the natural or usual way without being changed or stopped: The doctors agreed to let the illness run its course, rather than prescribe drugs which had little chance of success.We must allow justice to take its course.
See also: course, run, take
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

run

1. n. a session or period of time spent doing something; a period of time when something happens. The market had a good run today.
2. tv. to transport contraband, alcohol, or drugs. Harry the Horse used to run booze during prohibition.
3. n. an act of transporting contraband. Four soldiers were killed during a run.
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

run

/take its course
To follow its natural progression or development: Should we let the illness run its course?
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

run its course, to

To continue to the end; until it runs out. The word course, the ground on which a race is run, was used figuratively for the continuous process of time, events, or an action from the sixteenth century on. “The yeare hath runne his course,” wrote Abraham Fleming (A Panoplie of Epistles, 1576).
See also: run
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
Looking forward, we believe that it is very important that the agencies strengthen their commitment to the letter and spirit of the March 10 joint agreement, including the process for resolving issues related to allowance practices and the need to let this process run its course before significant changes, if any, are made to allowance levels.
You want the world to know your company exists and word-of-mouth publicity has run its course. Yet, the purse strings on your promotions budget are tight - you can't afford the hefty retainer fees and overhead expenses of traditional public relations firms.
Convinced that the situation was hopeless, Muraskas and his fellow doctors begged the Lakebergs to let nature run its course. "We sort of pleaded with them to take the babies off the ventilator," he says.
The creditors must then wait for the bankruptcy process to run its course in order to find out what funds are available and the likely percentage of payment relative to what is owed.
By the time the sorry "saga" had run its course, Wedtech or, more properly, the relatively small public and private money sources to which it provided special access, had become a schooling ground for as rich and greedy a variety of shark as ever gathered in one place in the history of American business.
The notion of "use-it-once-and-throw-it-away" has run its course.
Mrs Church added: ``She's very young and it is just a relationship that has run its course. We've all been through it, when you are that young you fall in and out of love all the time.
Millionaire property expert Nicholas Cowell, 42, yesterday insisted the ITV talent show had run its course.
Disused factories and warehouses are hard to keep, for they are large, occupying valuable land, and are usually in poor condition after industry has run its course. The result is that industrial cities lose almost all the buildings that gave them their character and raison d'etre, and wholesale redevelopments wipe out even the street pattern.
And while Chilly Beach may eventually run its course, Hawes intends to hire more people and develop a "whole stable of projects" in Sudbury.
However, the electron's energy usually dissipates among other surface electrons before such a reaction can run its course.