run into debt


Also found in: Legal.

run into debt

To owe money to someone or something (such as a bank or other lending institution). If you spend more with your credit cards than you can reasonably pay off, you'll run into debt before you know it.
See also: debt, run

ˌget/ˌrun into ˈdebt

begin to owe money: After she lost her job, she began to run into debt.
See also: debt, get, run
References in periodicals archive ?
Each morning when you wake up, you must know that your country has run into debt with new 685,000 euro because this is the average amount that the government has been running into debt over the past four years, former official Kire Naumov analyzes for Dnevnik.
It called on lenders to treat people who run into debt fairly and constructively, and to check carefully whether borrowers can afford further credit.
Maggie Dunn, who heads the Nurses National Negotiating Committee said: "This is causing significant hardship to nurses, some of whom have run into debt to go on holiday.
While we don't condone running up huge bills without the ability to pay, it is important that a large company realises some people need assistance when they run into debt.
Erol Rizaov analyzes for Utrinski Vesnik that according to how much they run into debt, how corrupt they are, their lies and how often they declare elections, Macedonians and Greeks are of the same origin.