run into


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run (one) into (some place)

To take one into an area or location. Let me just run Susan into the department store to get some shoes, and then we can go home. I'm going to be running my mother into the city tomorrow morning if you want a lift in.
See also: run

run (something) into (something)

To cause something to collide with something else by driving it, steering it, or setting it on a course toward that thing. I can't believe you ran your car into the side of a building. Were you drunk or something? Johnny likes to roll his ball down the hill and run it into his toy monsters.
See also: run

run into (someone, something, or some place)

1. To collide with someone or something. I can't believe you ran into the side of a building with your car. Were you drunk or something? She was rushing down the hallway and ran right into Thomas, knocking his papers everywhere.
2. To cause someone or something to collide with or into someone or something else. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "run" and "into." He ran his motorcycle into a ditch. The bus driver swerved off the road and ran us into a tree.
3. To go into some location very quickly or briefly, especially for some particular purpose. I just need to run into the office and get my phone charger. Do you mind if we run into the grocery store to pick up some milk on the way home?
4. To bring someone quickly into some area or location, especially by car. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "run" and "into." I'm running Jake into town for his karate lessons, so I won't be home until later. Let me just run Susan into the department store to get some shoes, and then we can go home.
5. To encounter someone by chance. Oh, I didn't tell you that I ran into Mary when I was at the movie theater. Everyone comes from all over town to this market on the weekend, so you never know who you might run into.
6. To incur, encounter, or enter into some undesirable condition or state. If you find yourself running into debt, get in touch with your financial adviser straight away. The project has been running into difficulty recently. We're not sure if we'll be able to complete it now.
7. To cause something or some group to enter into an undesirable condition or state. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "run" and "into." The new CEO ran the company into bankruptcy after just over a year. The project has been running into difficulty recently. We're not sure if we'll be able to complete it now.
8. To grow or accumulate into some very large number or amount. The development had already been running into the tens of millions by the time I was brought on board.
See also: run
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

run someone or something into something

 and run someone or something in
to take or drive someone or something into something or some place. Let me run you into the city this morning. I need the car today. Do you want to go to town? I have to run in George and you can come along.
See also: run

run something into something

 and run something in 
1. to guide or route something, such as a wire or a pipe, into something or a place. The worker ran the circuit into each room. He ran in the circuit as specified.
2. to guide something into something; to drive or steer something into something else. Bobby ran his bicycle into the wall, bending the front wheel. Please don't run your car into the wall! run something into the ground and drive something into the ground
1. Lit. to pound or force something into the ground. Use a heavy mallet to drive the stakes into the ground. Run this post into the ground and nail this sign to it.
2. Fig. to carry something too far. It was a good joke at first, Tom, but you've run it into the ground. Just because everyone laughed once, you don't have to drive it into the ground.
See also: run

run into someone or something

to bump into someone or something. I didn't mean to run into you. I'm sorry. Mary ran into the fence and scraped her elbow.
See also: run
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

run into

1. Meet or find by chance, as in I ran into an old friend at the concert. [c. 1900]
2. See run against, def. 1.
3. Collide with, as in The car ran straight into the retaining wall. [c. 1800]
4. Incur, as in We've run into extra expenses with the renovation, or James said they've run into debt. [c. 1400]
5. Mount up, increase to, as in Her book may well run into a second volume.
6. Follow without interruption, as in What with one day running into the next, we never knew just what day it was! or He spoke so fast his words ran into one another. [Late 1600s] Also see run into a stone wall; run into the ground.
See also: run
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

run into

v.
1. To go quickly into some place on foot: The wild horses ran into the woods.
2. To enter quickly or briefly some place on foot: I ran into the department store for some new socks.
3. To collide with something: I drove off the road and ran into a tree.
4. To drive or propel something and cause it to collide with something else: I ran my car into a tree. The truck ran the pedestrian into the guardrail.
5. To drive someone to some central place: I'll run you into the center of town and you can walk home from there.
6. To meet or find someone or something by chance: We ran into some old friends at the bar. I ran into a quaint restaurant outside of town.
7. To encounter some unpleasant or unfavorable situation: The travelers ran into some bad weather on their way over the mountains.
8. To amount to some quantity: His net worth runs into the millions.
See also: run
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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