run foul of


Also found in: Legal.

run foul of (someone or something)

To be in severe disagreement, trouble, or difficulty with someone or something; to be at odds with someone or something, especially due to disobeying rules or laws. Always look into the laws of any place you visit, or you may end up unwittingly running foul of the local police. Ms. Banks has run foul of this university for the last time. She is no longer welcome here!
See also: foul, of, run

run foul of

come into conflict with; go against.
This expression is nautical in origin: when used of a ship it means ‘collide or become entangled with an obstacle or another vessel’. Both literal and figurative uses were current by the late 17th century.
See also: foul, of, run
References in periodicals archive ?
(Sat, Electric) Inbred (18) Preview of Brit horror as young offenders and their care workers run foul of local inbred youths during a community service weekend in a remote Yorkshire village.
"Almost all the individuals belong to the political opposition in their country and have run foul of their political opponents or the authorities of their country.
However, when countries develop their own trade and tariff policies, they can run foul of international trade agreements.
It's not just overzealous fans who've run foul of the purple Prince of pop.
The case, he argued, does not run foul of the First Amendment, as it seeks redress not over the contents of the book itself but over the marketing of the book as a truthful account.
As well as the usual death and danger, an added complication is that they run foul of an ongoing FBI investigation, as well.
But stricter controls could run foul of legislation allowing the free movement of workers in the EU.
EFFORTS to turn the site of former well-known hotel into a care home have run foul of planners.
"This 'division' could end up causing headaches to both sides and eventually even a rift, especially since President Obama's desire to train and leave behind effective Afghan forces and start withdrawing American forces could run foul of an intact and resurgent Taliban movement in Afghanistan," the editorial went on to add.
The unilateral application of measures imposed on process and production methods could run foul of substantive GATT rules.
On account of these metrics therefore, we expect to see more banks run foul of the CBN audit of the remaining 14 banks.'
Or will that run foul of any local laws and regulations?
There were a lot of drug users and pushers who were yet to run foul of the law.
The Lord Chancellor has warned the media that naming the football stars may prejudice any future trial and they may also run foul of libel laws.
She has also has run foul of trade unions over her drive to transfer council houses, particularly in Glasgow, to housing associations, in return for the Government writing off the city's pounds 1billion housing debt.