run a tight ship, to

run a tight ship

To keep a place, group, or organization very well-organized and operating efficiently. Jane sure ran a tight ship around here. The department has devolved into chaos without her leadership.
See also: run, ship, tight

run a tight ship

 and run a taut ship
to run a ship or an organization in an orderly and disciplined manner. (Taut and tight mean the same thing. Taut is correct nautical use.) The new office manager really runs a tight ship. Captain Jones is known for running a taut ship.
See also: run, ship, tight

run a tight ship

If you run a tight ship, you keep firm control of the way your business or organization is run, so that it is organized and efficient. Shaona was running a tight ship and didn't waste time on small talk. Andy is totally organized and totally confident. He runs a tight ship and he does a great job.
See also: run, ship, tight

run a tight ship

be very strict in managing an organization or operation.
See also: run, ship, tight

run a ˌtight ˈship

run an organization in a strict and efficient way: The boss runs a very tight ship and everybody is expected to work very hard.
See also: run, ship, tight

run a tight ship, to

To direct a well-managed operation or strictly disciplined organization. This expression, dating from the second half of the twentieth century, alludes to a vessel whose ropes are taut (tight) and seams well caulked, indicating that it is well managed. The Saturday Review of Literature (June 24, 1972) stated: “The two student judges . . . ran a tight ship. Firm commands—‘There will be no knitting in my courtroom.’”
See also: run, tight