run (something) past (one)

run (something) past (one)

1. To explain or describe something to one; to inform one about something. I have an idea I'd like to run past you. OK, run the plan past me one more time.
2. To obtain one's permission for something. You'll need to run that past the boss before you do it. Please run those kinds of decisions past me next time, OK?
See also: past, run

run past

To pass (someone or something) while running. The kids ran right past without even saying hello. The boss ran past before I had a chance to ask him about the meeting.
See also: past, run
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

run something past someone

If you run an idea or a document past someone, you tell them about it or show it to them to get their opinion about it. I'll take these papers home and read them, and I'll want to run them past our lawyer. Not long after, White was invited to join the group — only to discover that Gentry had not run the idea past his colleagues.
See also: past, run, someone, something
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

run something past someone

mention something to someone as a suggestion, to elicit their views on it. informal
2003 Robert X. Cringely I, Cringely The business I am about to describe has not been legally tested. I have run it past a few lawyer friends of mine, but a true legal test can only be done in the courts.
See also: past, run, someone, something
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

run past

v.
1. To run near or alongside someone or something from one side to the other: A flock of wild turkeys ran past the barn.
2. To overtake someone or something by running: I was leading in the race, but then someone ran past me.
3. To continue later than some time: I will be late for dinner because our meeting will run past 7:00.
4. To tell, explain, or demonstrate something to someone: He ran many ideas past us, but we disliked them all.
See also: past, run
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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