ruling

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divide and rule

To gain or maintain power by fomenting discord among people so that they do not unite in opposition. The ascendancy of the faction occurred because they were able to divide and rule—they fooled the other parties into fighting while they rose to power.
See also: and, divide, rule

rule

slang To be excellent or exceptionally great; to be the best. Man, this restaurant rules! Everything they make here is absolutely delicious. A: "Did you ever watch 'GoBots' as a kid?" B: "Oh yeah, that show ruled!"

rule against (someone or something)

To issue a judgment that goes against someone's or something's case. The judge ruled against the father, stating that he had not shown adequate reason to have sole custody of the children.
See also: rule

rule for (someone or something)

To issue a judgment that is in someone's or something's favor. The court ruled for the local company, siding with its complaint that the multinational corporation infringed on its copyrighted patents.
See also: rule

rule in

To decide definitively that something will or can possibly happen. (Used especially—and somewhat redundantly—in the phrase "not ruled in or ruled out.") Look, nothing has been ruled in or ruled out at this stage, so we just have to wait until the doctors have more information to work with. We'll neither rule in nor rule out the possibility of a shakeup in management if this branch's profits continue to fall.
See also: rule

rule in favor of (someone or something)

To deliver or pronounce an official or formal judgment that is to the advantage of or approving of someone or something. The court ruled in favor of the local company, siding with its complaint that the multinational corporation infringed on its copyright. The committee ruled in favor of allowing the construction to proceed.
See also: favor, of, rule

rule OK

To be the best; to be the most dominant or in control; to be the most favored or supported by the public. (Used originally in relation to football clubs or local gangs in graffiti writing.) Primarily heard in UK. Someone had come with a can of black spray paint and crossed out the big "Leeds Rules OK" that was painted on the side of the school. But in this part of the country, the conservatives rule OK with almost no opposition.
See also: OK, rule

rule on (something)

To deliver or pronounce an official or formal judgment or decision regarding. The defendant asked for more time to provide additional evidence before the judge ruled on his case. The committee is expected to rule on the controversial issue in the next week or so.
See also: on, rule

rule out

To eliminate, prevent, preclude, or cancel someone or something as a possibility. They ruled Jim out when they were considering a replacement manager due to his tendency to show up late. I guess that rules out our trip to Portugal this summer.
See also: out, rule

rule over (someone or something)

To exercise absolute authority or control over someone or something. The dictator rules over the region with an iron fist. He had visions of ruling over the company when he took the promotion, but he actually had very little power in running the day-to-day operations.
See also: over, rule

rule the roost

To be the real boss; to be the person in charge. You just need to accept that your daughter is going to rule the roost for most of her childhood. For all intents and purposes, it's the assistant manager who rules the roost.
See also: roost, rule

rule with a rod of iron

To rule, govern, or control a group or population with complete power over all aspects of life, work, etc. He rules with a rod of iron, and moves swiftly to gain control over any entity that is not already in his grasp. She has ruled this company with a rod of iron for three decades, and it's going to be difficult for her to let go of control.
See also: iron, of, rod, rule

rule with a velvet glove

To rule, govern, or control a group or population in a very permissive, lenient, or flexible manner. A noun or pronoun can be used between "rule" and "with." The principal has been ruling the school with a velvet glove, trusting students to behave and follow the rules of their own accord. Not surprisingly, the place is in near-constant chaos. You can't rule with a velvet glove and expect every employees to put in their full efforts day in, day out.
See also: glove, rule, velvet

rule with an iron fist

To rule, govern, or control a group or population with complete, typically tyrannical authority over all aspects of life, work, etc. A noun or pronoun can be used between "rule" and "with." He rules with an iron fist, and moves swiftly to gain control over any entity that is not already in his grasp. She has ruled this company with an iron fist for three decades, and it's going to be difficult for her to let go of control.
See also: fist, iron, rule

rule with an iron hand

To rule, govern, or control a group or population with complete, typically tyrannical authority over all aspects of life, work, etc. A noun or pronoun can be used between "rule" and "with." He rules with an iron hand, and moves swiftly to gain control over any entity that is not already in his grasp. She has ruled this company with an iron hand for three decades, and it's going to be difficult for her to let go of control.
See also: hand, iron, rule

rule with an iron rod

To rule, govern, or control a group or population with complete, typically tyrannical authority over all aspects of life, work, etc. A noun or pronoun can be used between "rule" and "with." He rules with an iron rod, and moves swiftly to gain control over any entity that is not already in his grasp. She has ruled this company with an iron rod for three decades, and it's going to be difficult for her to let go of control.
See also: iron, rod, rule
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

rule someone or something out

to prevent, disqualify, overrule, or cancel someone or something. John's bad temper rules him out for the job. The rainy weather ruled out a picnic for the weekend.
See also: out, rule

rule the roost

Fig. to be the boss or manager, especially at home. Who rules the roost at your house? Our new office manager really rules the roost.
See also: roost, rule

rule with a velvet glove

Fig. to rule in a very gentle way. She rules with a velvet glove, but she gets things done, nonetheless. He may appear to rule with a velvet glove, but he is really quite cruel.
See also: glove, rule, velvet

rule with an iron fist

Fig. to rule in a very stern manner. The dictator ruled with an iron fist and terrified the citizens. My boss rules with an iron fist. I'm looking for a new job.
See also: fist, iron, rule
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

rule out

1. Eliminate from consideration, exclude, as in The option of starting over again has been ruled out. [Second half of 1800s]
2. Prevent, make impossible, as in The snowstorm ruled out our weekly rehearsal. [First half of 1900s]
See also: out, rule

rule the roost

Be in charge, boss others, as in In our division the chairman's son rules the roost. This expression originated in the 15th century as rule the roast, which was either a corruption of rooster or alluded to the person who was in charge of the roast and thus ran the kitchen. In the barnyard a rooster decides which hen should roost near him. Both interpretations persisted for 200 years. Thomas Heywood (c. 1630) put it as "Her that ruled the roast in the kitchen," but Shakespeare had it in 2 Henry VI (1:1): "The new-made duke that rules the roast," which is more ambiguous. In the mid-1700s roost began to compete with roast, and in the 1900s roost displaced roast altogether. Also see run the show.
See also: roost, rule
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

rule the roost

COMMON
1. If someone rules the roost, they are the most powerful and important person in a group. In Germany, scientists will be found at the top of many manufacturing companies; in Britain, accountants rule the roost. Unfortunately he's a weak manager who lets the players rule the roost when he's meant to be in charge.
2. If something rules the roost it is more powerful or popular than the things that it is being compared to. Today, the cartels still rule the roost and the authorities seem as impotent as ever. Note: This expression seems to refer to the dominant cock in a chicken coop. However, `rule the roost' may have developed from the earlier expression `rule the roast', which refers to the head of the household who carves and serves the meat.
See also: roost, rule
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

divide and rule (or conquer)

the policy of maintaining supremacy over your opponents by encouraging dissent between them, thereby preventing them from uniting against you.
This is a maxim associated with a number of rulers, and is found in Latin as divide et impera and in German as entzwei und gebiete . Since the early 17th century, English writers have often wrongly attributed it to the Italian political philosopher Niccolò Machiavelli ( 1469–1527 ).
See also: and, divide, rule

rule the roost

be in complete control.
The original expression was rule the roast , which was common from the mid 16th century onwards. Although none of the early examples of its use shed any light on its source, we can surmise that it originally referred to someone being the most important person at a banquet or feast. Rule the roost, found from the mid 18th century, has now replaced the earlier version.
See also: roost, rule
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

diˌvide and ˈrule

keep control over people by making them disagree with and fight each other, therefore not giving them the chance to unite and oppose you together: a policy of divide and rule
See also: and, divide, rule

rule the ˈroost

(informal) be the person who controls a group, family, community, etc: It is a family firm, where the owner’s mother rules the roost.
A roost is a place where birds sleep.
See also: roost, rule
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

rule out

v.
1. To prevent or preclude something: The snowstorm ruled out their weekly meeting. Our lack of funds ruled the vacation plans out.
2. To eliminate something from consideration; exclude something: The referee has ruled out the option of starting over. I wanted to drop the course, but school policy ruled that option out.
3. To draw a line or lines through something to delete or obscure it; cross something out: The copyeditors ruled out all of our mistakes on the manuscript.
See also: out, rule
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

rule

in. to dominate; to be the best. (Slang only in certain contexts. Typical in graffiti.) Pizza rules around here.
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

rule the roost

Informal
To be in charge; dominate: In this house my parents rule the roost.
See also: roost, rule
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
See also:
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This ruling expands the types of tuition payments that may be deductible as medical expenses.
So the Rivera case seems to confirm the IRS's previous letter ruling: a vacation home is investment property (and available for a 1031 exchange) if you have some expectation that it will appreciate in value.
There is no indication, however, that the IRS intends to retreat from its historic ruling position that differential payments to former employees called to active duty by the Federal government or into federal service as a member of the National Guard are not wages for employment tax purposes because the employment relationship was "interrupted." Since the most recent iteration of the guidance nearly 35 years ago, there has been no additional guidance addressing whether the conclusion that the employment relationship was "interrupted" still holds true today.
Subsequent to the ruling, the Minister of Justice, Martin Cauchon, refused to appeal the ruling to the Supreme Court of Canada.
Higher education groups cheered the ruling as a victory for affirmative action supporters.
However, this ruling is quick to limit its application:
For the most part, at least at the upper judicial levels, rulings seem to have been guided by the desire to put children in the best of all possible situations.
The word public really has more to do with holding yourself out to the public." Wolfson characterized the ruling as "an incredible victory" for gay rights.
The ruling noted that the issues in the case were the same as those considered in Tanner, 117 TC 237 (2001), aff'd, 65 FedAppx 508 (Fifth Cir.
The court, ruling 2-1, declared that public school sponsorship of a pledge containing "under God" ran afoul of the religious neutrality required by the Constitution.
According to the revenue procedure, which was released on June 23, 2003, the IRS will continue to issue private letter rulings concluding that transactions qualify under section 355, but will base those rulings on the taxpayer's representations that the foregoing three core requirements are satisfied.
The day after Boerne, the Supreme Court unanimously reversed federal appellate rulings in Vacco v.
This two-part article discusses recent legislation, cases, rulings, regulations and other developments in the S corporation area.