rule for (someone or something)

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rule for (someone or something)

To issue a judgment that is in someone's or something's favor. The court ruled for the local company, siding with its complaint that the multinational corporation infringed on its copyrighted patents.
See also: for, rule
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

rule for

v.
To deliver a judgment that is in favor of someone or something: The court ruled for the plaintiff and awarded damages in the amount of $10,000.
See also: for, rule
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in classic literature ?
To these encroachments, time and ignorance, the two great supporters of imposture, gave authority; and thus many rules for good writing have been established, which have not the least foundation in truth or nature; and which commonly serve for no other purpose than to curb and restrain genius, in the same manner as it would have restrained the dancing-master, had the many excellent treatises on that art laid it down as an essential rule that every man must dance in chains.
Napoleon felt this, and from the time he took up the correct fencing attitude in Moscow and instead of his opponent's rapier saw a cudgel raised above his head, he did not cease to complain to Kutuzov and to the Emperor Alexander that the war was being carried on contrary to all the rules- as if there were any rules for killing people.
James: What we have been pointing out with the NAIC is that existing rules for writing reinsurance business are unfair and discriminatory because one group of reinsurers is treated differently from another group.
15a.453-1(c)(1) provides rules for allocating a taxpayer's basis to payments received and to be received in a contingent-payment sale.
The proposed regulations instead request comments on the relevant rules for determining the appropriate unit of property for network assets.
In June 2003 the Institute's professional ethics executive committee (PEEC) adopted independence rules for members who provide nonattest services to attest clients.
The committee also tightened rules for some types of information technology-related services.
The Rules of Practice and Procedure contain guidelines for various ITC investigations, including rules of general application, rules for increased import investigations (including global safeguard and bilateral safeguard investigations), rules for countervailing duty and antidumping investigations (including NAFTA Panel Reviews) and rules for investigations of infringement pertaining to patents, trademarks, copyrights or other unfair trade practices in import trade.
Almost simultaneously, the General Accounting Office issued proposed changes to the accountant independence rules for all engagements done in accordance with Government Auditing Standards.
Of course, the result may well be stricter rules for non-public clients.
Epstein's new book, Simple Rules for a Complex World, will give them even more cause to be afraid.
The final regulations, however, provide a single set of rules for amounts paid to facilitate such acquisitions, regardless of whether the transaction is structured as an acquisition of the entity or as an acquisition of assets (including tangible assets) constituting a trade or business.
* The exchange and settlement of electronic payments in the United States is governed by a uniform body of operating rules for the originating and receiving parties.
The rule change was supported by the American Institute of CPAS tax executive committee, which had voted unanimously to support HR 406, a bill to modify the involuntary conversion rules for personal property losses resulting from natural disasters.
The tax rules for hedging transactions have pitfalls; one of the biggest is the tax identification requirements.