rule OK

rule OK

To be the best; to be the most dominant or in control; to be the most favoured or supported by the public. (Used originally in relation to football clubs or local gangs in graffiti writing.) Primarily heard in UK. Someone had come with a can of black spray paint and crossed out the big "Leeds Rules OK" that was painted on the side of the school. But in this part of the country, the conservatives rule OK with almost no opposition.
See also: OK, rule

— rule(s), OK?

used to express your enthusiasm for a particular person or thing. informal, humorous
2000 Elle Here at ELLE we've always been big fans of Kerrigan's urban babewear, and this season…she really rocked. Daryl K rules, OK?
See also: OK
References in periodicals archive ?
After releasing their debut album, Dandys Rule OK, in 1995, the quartet have gone on to clock up seven Top 40 singles in the UK charts.
District Judge Bernadette Kelly told him: "It's a case of Lithuanian rule OK.
Fabiano Martell (Bernardo) and James McEvoy (Riff) convince us that hoodlums rule OK.
Rhodri Owen previews a new book which claims that granny and grandpa rule ok
Luckily for comedy fans young and old and despite the best efforts of the BBC, The Goodies still rule OK.
For society is now so brainwashed into believing that youth is all, anyone who suggests otherwise is regarded as slightly loopy - and certainly too old to get the point that 20-somethings, teenagers even, rule OK.
After the overwhelming force that the USA and Britain used in Afghanistan and Iraq, the terrorists still rule OK.
The Dandys first started getting the buzz in 1995 with their debut album, Dandys Rule OK.
Despite the best intentions of Jack McConnell and his merry boys and girls, who this week rolled out yet another initiative, the young thugs still rule OK.
But now after Cantona's exit and a blistering England debut, Scholes is ready to rule OK in his own kingdom.