rude

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rude awakening

The shocking instance of learning the unpleasant or unwelcome truth about a situation. We had a rude awakening when the waiter brought us the bill and we saw how much we had spent on dinner and drinks.
See also: awaken, rude

age before beauty

A humorous way to tell someone to go ahead of one, meant as a playful insult. Chuck held the door open for Tim, motioned for him to go ahead, and said, "Age before beauty."
See also: age, beauty, before

age before beauty

a jocular and slightly rude way of encouraging someone to go ahead of oneself; a comical, teasing, and slightly grudging way of indicating that someone else should or can go first. "No, no. Please, you take the next available seat," smiled Tom. "Age before beauty, you know."
See also: age, beauty, before

a rude awakening

COMMON If you have had a rude awakening, you have been forced to realize the unpleasant truth about something. Such details as have emerged about the new economic package suggest that these citizens are indeed in for a rude awakening. Johnson was confident he could make a quick profit. But, instead of quick profits, he got a rude awakening.
See also: awaken, rude

a rude awakening

a sudden realization of the true (bad) state of affairs, having previously been under the illusion that everything was satisfactory.
2004 The New Farm It must have been a rude awakening for the world powers when upstart Third-World countries began to flex their collective muscle.
See also: awaken, rude

a rude aˈwakening

(written) a sudden, unexpected discovery of an unpleasant fact, truth, etc: If he thinks that the exam’s going to be easy, he’s going to get a rude awakening.
See also: awaken, rude

rude

1. mod. undesirable; unpleasant. The prof in my history class is a rude dude, for sure.
2. mod. cool; pleasant; excellent. Man, that’s a rude bike!

age before beauty

Defer to the older person. This phrase is traditionally used when inviting another individual to pass through a doorway before one. Eric Partridge described it as a mock courtesy uttered by a young woman to an older man. Currently it is used only ironically or sarcastically. According to an old story, it was said rather snidely by Clare Boothe Luce when ushering Dorothy Parker through a doorway, and Parker replied, “Pearls before swine.” A related cliché is after you, Alphonse—no, after you, Gaston, repeated a number of times (in Britain, after you, Claude—no, after you, Cecil). The American version is based on a comic strip by Frederick Burr Opper, Alphonse and Gaston, which was popular in the early 1900s, and pokes fun at exaggerated politeness.
See also: age, beauty, before
References in periodicals archive ?
Neither did the famous British diplomat Duff Cooper who, like Waugh, was prone to outbursts of uncontrolled rudeness and irascibility.
I've never experienced rudeness like that in my career.
As one of the few Loose Women panellists you wouldn't be afraid to meet in a dark alley, Millican's unique selling point is her very ordinariness and she has the audience eating out of the palm of her hand with her down to earth observations, self-deprecating humour (lots of it about her love of food and aversion to exercise) and rudeness, diluted through that unthreatening Geordie accent.
Even though Joe's take was zero, police still sought him out for stupidity and rudeness, we guess.
In response to the letter 'Shocked at rudeness of kids in the UAE' and the comments that followed...
Sherlock doesn't care about anyone's feelings, is never embarrassed and is blunt to the point of rudeness. He doesn't bother saying please and is often mean to poor Watson.
A memorable contributor, Aboriginal writer Joy Asham, relates nurses' "terrible rudeness" to her after she had a nasty scooter spill on an icy road in Thunder Bay, Ontario.
Only those who think English is the only proper language of this country would think that rude, and quite frankly, people with that attitude deserve a bit of rudeness!
It is noisy, contentious, full of hand shaking and baby kissing, bribery, rudeness, the dumping of a group voters into a canal, and other chicanery.
Now the rudeness of Stephen Sackur (should be sacked) has spoiled the programme.
Cyrus later defended her outburst on Twitter writing, "I can't tolerate that kind of rudeness."
But when properly deployed, rudeness might actually be worth preserving, the philosopher Emrys Westacott argues in The Virtues of Our Vices (Princeton), along with gossip, snobbery, bawdy humor, and disrespect.
Expect random violence (mostly afflicted upon a diminutive Spanish waiter), obsequious toadying and down right rudeness while you try to enjoy a three-course meal without choking with laughter.
Besides, whenever the question or issue of encroachments is raised, the owners of these illegal and makeshift slaughterhouses often respond with great rudeness and even threats.