rude

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rude awakening

The shocking instance of learning the unpleasant or unwelcome truth about a situation. We had a rude awakening when the waiter brought us the bill and we saw how much we had spent on dinner and drinks.
See also: awaken, rude

age before beauty

A humorous way to tell someone to go ahead of one, meant as a playful insult. Chuck held the door open for Tim, motioned for him to go ahead, and said, "Age before beauty."
See also: age, beauty, before

age before beauty

a jocular and slightly rude way of encouraging someone to go ahead of oneself; a comical, teasing, and slightly grudging way of indicating that someone else should or can go first. "No, no. Please, you take the next available seat," smiled Tom. "Age before beauty, you know."
See also: age, beauty, before

a rude awakening

COMMON If you have had a rude awakening, you have been forced to realize the unpleasant truth about something. Such details as have emerged about the new economic package suggest that these citizens are indeed in for a rude awakening. Johnson was confident he could make a quick profit. But, instead of quick profits, he got a rude awakening.
See also: awaken, rude

a rude awakening

a sudden realization of the true (bad) state of affairs, having previously been under the illusion that everything was satisfactory.
2004 The New Farm It must have been a rude awakening for the world powers when upstart Third-World countries began to flex their collective muscle.
See also: awaken, rude

a rude aˈwakening

(written) a sudden, unexpected discovery of an unpleasant fact, truth, etc: If he thinks that the exam’s going to be easy, he’s going to get a rude awakening.
See also: awaken, rude

rude

1. mod. undesirable; unpleasant. The prof in my history class is a rude dude, for sure.
2. mod. cool; pleasant; excellent. Man, that’s a rude bike!

age before beauty

Defer to the older person. This phrase is traditionally used when inviting another individual to pass through a doorway before one. Eric Partridge described it as a mock courtesy uttered by a young woman to an older man. Currently it is used only ironically or sarcastically. According to an old story, it was said rather snidely by Clare Boothe Luce when ushering Dorothy Parker through a doorway, and Parker replied, “Pearls before swine.” A related cliché is after you, Alphonse—no, after you, Gaston, repeated a number of times (in Britain, after you, Claude—no, after you, Cecil). The American version is based on a comic strip by Frederick Burr Opper, Alphonse and Gaston, which was popular in the early 1900s, and pokes fun at exaggerated politeness.
See also: age, beauty, before
References in periodicals archive ?
She said that when she asked Adriatico for help, he spoke to her rudely as he took a video of her reactions using his cell phone.
Even when she rudely told him the first, perfectly nice, flat was "mortifying".
This was at the end of October in 2009 when the balmy spell of Indian summer weather ended rudely with the arrival of a windy washout.
Summary: The stars of The Inbetweeners have completed their Red Nose Day, to find 50 rudely named places in 50 hours.
1946: Television resumed after the second world war, and announcer Leslie Mitchell said: "As I was saying before I was so rudely interrupted..."
Media coverage teams were strongly and quite rudely dissuaded from entry and coverage, and were rudely rebuked when questioned about the fairness of these tests; a situation, clearly depicting the pathetic state of transparency of these tests.
Clegg rudely interrupted David Cameron (as did Gordon Brown) when he was explaining his case in the first debate.
But he was rudely awakened by water being sprinkled on his face.
1946: Television resumed after the war, and announcer Leslie Mitchell said: "As I was saying before I was so rudely interrupted..." 1989: Peter Shilton made his record 109th appearance for England against Denmark, passing Bobby Moore's long-standing record.
I WAS rudely awakened from deep slumber, at 12.06am by an incoming text message.
Judges and court staff act unethically and rudely at times, either in court room or outside court," President Bakiev said."This is true not only about judges.
It is a quaint phrase, but oh-so-true-Further over in the "pioneer section" is an old, bleached, white stone marking the grave of a young girl which reads, Weep not for the loved one so rudely from thee driven, Thou had a flower too good for earth, transplanted into beaten.
When endeavouring to detail cause and effect on a Radio WM phone-in the other morning, I was rudely shut up by an apparent would-be thought policeman for having the temerity to point out that many old people are living in near penury, suffering an inferior NHS that is now under threat, poor social services, etc, while nothing appears too good for the irresponsible and those who have contributed nothing to our society.
Stella is a stammering teenager who is rudely evacuated from her familiar surroundings, her best friend and the stimulating city of London.
Like the melody, Krakow's urban development evolved with beauty, consistency and practical purpose until it was rudely truncated by the Second World War and the subsequent Communist regime.