References in classic literature ?
We rowed until we were out of sight of the town, and then, with a wide stretch of water in front of us, and the wind blowing a perfect hurricane across it, we felt that the time had come to commence operations.
We had had a sail - a good all-round exciting, interesting sail - and now we thought we would have a row, just for a change like.
Then he took his place in the first row of the stalls and sat down beside Dolokhov, nudging with his elbow in a friendly and offhand way that Dolokhov whom others treated so fawningly.
to the Shoes of Fortune this was the cue; the whole man shrunk together and a most uncommon journey through the hearts of the front row of spectators, now began.
In the greatest perplexity, he now came out of the last heart in the row; he was unable to put his thoughts in order, and fancied that his too lively imagination had run away with him.
Now, therefore, let us all do as I say, trust in Jove and row on with might and main.
At last I let go with my hands and feet, and fell heavily into the sea, hard by my raft on to which I then got, and began to row with my hands.
As I drew a still fresher soil about the rows with my hoe, I disturbed the ashes of unchronicled nations who in primeval years lived under these heavens, and their small implements of war and hunting were brought to the light of this modern day.
On the ground, children from Devil's Row closed in on their antagonist.
The mansion in Saville Row, though not sumptuous, was exceedingly comfortable.
There was a row of windows extending nearly around the sides of the circular room, which rendered the place very light, and there was a back door in addition to the one leading to the front part of the house.
Taft's beds were three miles away, and for a long time we rowed silently in the wake of the other boats, once in a while grounding and our oar blades constantly striking bottom.
If the Floss were but a quiet lake instead of a river, we should be independent of any gentleman, for Maggie can row splendidly.
The caplin schooled once more at twilight, when the mad clamour was repeated; and at dusk they rowed back to dress down by the light of kerosene-lamps on the edge of the pen.
The tide, beginning to run down at nine, and being with us until three, we intended still to creep on after it had turned, and row against it until dark.