rounded

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Related to roundedness: roundness

round down

To use a lower or the next-lowest number, especially so as to eliminate decimal places. (Usually done when the non-whole number is less than .5; higher than that, and the number would typically be rounded up.) A noun or pronoun can be used between "round" and "down." Most stores round their prices down to .99 instead of keeping them as whole numbers. The accountant had been using the exact numbers from the sales data, while I had been rounding them down when doing my own calculations.
See also: down, round

round down to (something)

To express a number as a lower or the next-lowest number, especially so as to eliminate decimal places in a non-whole number. (Usually done when the non-whole portion is less than 0.5; decimals of 0.5 and up would typically be rounded up.) A noun or pronoun can be used between "round" and "down." The bill came out to $41.73, but they were nice enough to just round it down to $40 even. You can't just round these figures down to whole numbers—you've got to report them exactly as they are.
See also: down, round, to

round in

1. dated To herd animals, especially cattle, together; to round animals up. I worked on a ranch for a little while, mostly helping to round in the cattle.
2. dated In sailing, to haul in the slack of a loose line that passes through one or more blocks, especially a brace. You there! Clear away the bowlines and round in the braces!
See also: round

round off

1. To eliminate the decimals from a fraction in order to create a whole number, either by moving to the next lowest number when the decimals are less than one half, or moving up the next highest number when the decimals are greater than one half. A noun or pronoun can be used between "round" and "off." Please round off the figures used in your return, as failure to do so may result in delay to it being processed correctly. You can't just round the number off like that—it has to be exact!
2. To finish or complement something, especially in a perfect or appropriate way. A noun or pronoun can be used between "round" and "off." We rounded off the evening with a lovely walk through Central Park. I actually think it's nicer to round a meal off with a selection of cheeses, rather than a dessert.
See also: off, round

round off to (something)

To express a number as a higher or lower figure, as by eliminating all or some of the decimals from a fraction or by writing the number as a multiple of 10. A noun or pronoun can be used between "round" and "off." For the sake of simplicity, just round off to a whole number before entering the figure into the calculation. These larger companies tend to round off to the nearest million or hundred-thousand when reporting their sales figures to the public. Because the fraction 1/3 is infinitely repeating, we normally just round off to 0.33.
See also: off, round, to

round on

To suddenly attack, berate, or show hostility toward someone, especially verbally. I know he seems friendly, but he'll round on you in an instant if you disagree with him. I was really taken aback when Sally rounded on me because of what I said. It was just a joke, after all!
See also: on, round

round out

To complete or complement something in an appropriate or satisfactory way. A noun or pronoun can be used between "round" and "out." Let's round out the evening with a sunset walk on the beach. The singer's solo rounded out the performance really well. I actually think it's nicer to round a meal out with a selection of fine cheeses as opposed to a dessert.
See also: out, round

round to

1. In sailing, to turn in the direction of something. The lead boat lost control and began rounding to starboard.
2. dated In sailing, to turn the vessel into the wind. (Used without an object.) The captain ordered the helmsman to round to, then dropped anchor once the boat had come to a stop.
See also: round, to

round up

To use a higher or the next-highest number, especially so as to eliminate decimal places. (Usually done when the non-whole number is .5 or greater; lower than that, and the number would typically be rounded down.) A noun or pronoun can be used between "round" and "up." Most stores mark their prices at .99 instead of rounding them up to whole numbers. The accountant had been using the exact numbers from the sales data, while I had been rounding them up when doing my own calculations.
See also: round, up

round up to (something)

To express a number as a higher or the next-highest number, especially so as to eliminate decimal places in a non-whole number. (Usually done when the non-whole number is .5 or greater; lower than that, and the number would typically be rounded down.) A noun or pronoun can be used between "round" and "up." Most stores mark their prices at .99 instead of rounding up to the nearest dollar. The accountant had been using the exact numbers from the sales data, while I had been rounding them up to whole numbers when doing my own calculations.
See also: round, to, up

round upon (one)

To suddenly attack, berate, or show hostility toward one. (A more formal variant of "round on one.") He rounded upon the would-be assailant, knocking him to the ground and bludgeoning him with his cane. The senator rounded upon the reporter after he accused her of accepting bribes.
See also: round, upon
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

round someone or something up

to locate and gather someone or something. Please round the suspects up for questioning. The police rounded up the two possible suspects.
See also: round, up

round something down

to reduce a fractional part of a number to the next lowest whole number. (See also round off to something.) You can round this figure down if you want. It won't affect the total all that much. Please round down all figures having fractions less than one-half.
See also: down, round

round something off

to change a number to the next higher or lower whole number. (See also round off to something.) You should round 8.122 off. I rounded off 8.789 to 9.
See also: off, round

round something off (with something)

to finish something with something; to complement something with something. We rounded the meal off with a fine cognac. We rounded off the meal with a sinful dessert.
See also: off, round

round something out

to complete or enhance something. We will round the evening out with dessert at a nice restaurant. They rounded out the meal with dessert.
See also: out, round

round something up

 
1. to collect a group of people or things; to organize people or things into a group. The cowboys rounded up the cattle for market. See if you can round some helpers up.
2. to change a number to the next higher whole number. (See also round off to something.) I rounded up 8.789 to 9. You should round $65.99 up to $66.
See also: round, up
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

round off

1. Change a number to the closest whole number or the closest multiple of 10. For example, Rounding it off, I expect the new school addition will cost a million dollars.
2. Also, round out. Finish, complete, especially in a neat or perfect way. For example, They rounded off the dinner with a magnificent liqueur, or That stamp rounded out his collection. [Mid-1700s; variant, mid-1800s] Also see round out.
See also: off, round

round on

Turn on, assail, especially verbally. For example, They all rounded on Jake for not upholding the party line. [Mid-1800s]
See also: on, round

round out

1. See round off, def. 2.
2. Grow or develop to a round form, as in The tree was spindly when first planted, but it has since rounded out nicely. [c. 1900]
See also: out, round

round up

Collect or gather in a body, as in We'll have to round up some more volunteers for the food drive, or The police rounded up all the suspects. This term comes from the West, where since the mid-1800s it has been used for collecting livestock by riding around the herd and driving the animals together. By about 1875 it was extended to other kinds of gathering together.
See also: round, up
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

round on

v.
To assail someone suddenly; turn on someone: The entire group rounded on me when I questioned their motives.
See also: on, round

round out

v.
To bring some event or achievement to a pleasing conclusion or completeness, especially by enhancing it: This last song will round out our performance for this evening. Let's round the meal out with a glass of wine.
See also: out, round

round up

v.
1. To herd some cattle together from various places: In the evening it's time to round up the herd. The ranchers rounded the younger cattle up to brand them.
2. To seek out and bring some people or things together; gather some people or things: We rounded up all of our neighbors to help clean the park. Go out and round the kids up for dinner.
3. To change some exact number to the nearest whole number above it: The statistician rounded 4.612 up to 5. When you take the test, round up your answers.
See also: round, up
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
We may ask in what ways Lukacs's reflections on totality become a critical corollary to Pierre's dream of a watery globe, a Utopian hermeneutics that seeks to wrest meaning from global cataclysm, a search to recover the world's "roundedness."
If the general opinion that low frequency correlates with roundedness is accepted and used as the principal guideline, then the dispersion of points in the three charts suggests that very careful interpretation is demanded.
After all, much of today's theater depends upon stylization and improvisatory playfulness, as opposed to the assumed roundedness of naturalism; the fragility of appearance can be in itself a source of pleasure.
The description challenged Macmillan to remove passages he feared too seductive for his readers; most famous of the many changes Tennyson made for Macmillan is the following description of an Oread quoted from Every Saturday, reinserted by Tennyson for the American edition because "they are not so squeamish as we are" (Letters, 2:483): "how the sun delights / To glance and shift about her slippery sides / And rosy knees, and supple roundedness, / And budded bosom-peaks.
"This has come at an opportune time for our students, who will benefit from the roundedness of the programme.
Bagayoko's relentless push for committed participation in coursework, seminars, conferences and the well roundedness of the program."
"They were not asked to solicit a right or wrong answer; they were just to get to know the particular candidate, their background, their well roundedness, what they have to juggle in their lives, time commitments," Pozzuoli said.
The treatment here provides a good sense of the roundedness of the authors' approach to designing.
Also a part of its well roundedness is the company's staff of approximately 125 people that work on new product development.
He appreciates the roundedness audiences require in a newspaper - meaningful news both local and foreign, current events analyses, in-depth business reporting, intelligent sports coverage, thoughtful treatment of culture and entertainment.
So it is entirely appropriate that the exhibition begin with a drawing of Verrocchio's, which shows that sfumato--a technique for depicting the way light and dark softly and almost indiscernibly grade into each other, convey the roundedness of a form--was already a matter of studio practice when Leonardo was in his teens.
Auslander attempts to root her poetry in her own existence, dreams, a linguistic playfulness, and self-referential poetological roundedness, which often find expression in an aesthetically reduced form.
But how does the good biographer convey the subject's life in all its "roundedness"?
To deny her the full roundedness of her humanity would be to do her a disservice.
Joe Mantello's direction is largely unobtrusive, and he elicits some very fine work from Caldwell, who brings a rich roundedness to her character, helped by Simon's most inspired writing Her scene of reconciliation with her husband is both the play's funniest and most moving.