roughneck

(redirected from rough-neck)

roughhouse

1. verb To engage in boisterous, rowdy physical behavior, especially in play. I don't want you two roughhousing in the living room anymore, or you could end up breaking something!
2. noun An act or instance of such play. Tom never really enjoyed roughhouse as a kid, preferring quieter activities like coloring and reading.

roughneck

1. noun A tough, brutal, and violent person, especially a man. The mob boss sent a couple roughnecks down to the docks to force Tom Dillard to pay his debts. The bar was filled with roughnecks who looked as though they would just as soon break your hand as shake it.
2. noun A laborer who works on an oil rig. You find yourself losing your sense of what's socially acceptable after living alongside your fellow roughnecks for months at a time out on a rig in the middle of the ocean. It's incredible dangerous, physically demanding work, but a roughneck can earn an incredible amount of money each year.
3. verb To work as a laborer on an oil rig. I've been roughnecking for about 20 years now, and it has definitely taken a toll on my body. I roughnecked for a couple of summers to earn enough money to pay for my college tuition.

roughhouse

and roughneck
1. n. a mean kid; a boisterous child, usually male. Jimmy! Stop acting like such a roughhouse.
2. in. to be boisterous. The boys broke the lamp when they were roughnecking around in the family room.

roughneck

verb
References in classic literature ?
He was described as a bully, a hoodlum, a rough-neck, a professional slugger whose presence in the ranks was a disgrace to organized labor.
"He's a rough-neck sailor, and he's got a quick, bad temper."
And clear across to the Atlantic, the Junta in touch with them all and all of them needing guns, mere adventurers, soldiers of fortune, bandits, disgruntled American union men, socialists, anarchists, rough-necks, Mexican exiles, peons escaped from bondage, whipped miners from the bull-pens of Coeur d'Alene and Colorado who desired only the more vindictively to fight--all the flotsam and jetsam of wild spirits from the madly complicated modern world.
Precisely at that point it vanished 6 and I was looking at an elegant young rough-neck, a year or two over thirty, whose elaborate formality of speech just missed being absurd," she read.
Though the choice was mocked by fans of the novel, as the character is a conman described as an "elegant rough-neck".
I longed to be like William, a loveable rough-neck whose triumphs over the stultefying adult word came not via arson or destruction but ultimately through his own imagination and wits.
Smart-aleck lattes, medieval bagel comedians, rough-neck muffin gangs, and caffeine inspired takeoffs on the masterpieces of famous artists are all part of author Mike Clarke's wacky world of coffee-based humor.
At times he struggled in school, finally leaving Yale to rough-neck in the Texas oilfields.
And while their rough-neck reputation isn't undeserved,
Despised by the rough-neck crew for being a `landlubbin Johnny Raw', and `a grass-combin' cow-handed lobcock', poor Kydd is put under the tutelage of a tough-but-twinkly-eyed old sailor, Joe Bowyer.
The only bright spark was Derek Ezenagu, who played the group's first and extremely overpowering 'rough-neck from Jamaica' manager.
The characters were all there, from the homophobic, racist ex-colonel to the lithe Grace Kelly lookalike with the foreign accent and rough-neck boyfriend.
But Lloyd became as famous for his off-screen drunken antics as he was for his gritty portrayal of a rough-neck copper.
Roy Thomson was a self-confessed Canadian rough-neck who built up a string of local papers and radio stations.
Three determinants of that election were the security forces, which include thugs and rough-necks or enforcers, as they are called; finance; and INEC.