rough and tumble


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rough and tumble

Rowdy, disorderly, and boisterous; marked by scuffles or infighting. An allusion to a boxing match in which there are no rules. Sometimes hyphenated when used before a noun. The kids started getting a bit too rough and tumble when their cousin Jake came over. It's healthy for them to have a bit of rough-and-tumble play, so long as they make time for quiet play, as well.
See also: and, rough, tumble

the rough and tumble of (something)

The disorder, aggressive infighting, arguing, or competitiveness of something. An allusion to a boxing match in which there are no rules. I just wanted to make a difference to the people who lived in my community. I wasn't prepared for the rough and tumble of local politics.
See also: and, of, rough, tumble

rough-and-tumble

 and rough-and-ready
disorderly; aggressive. That was a rough-and-tumble football game. George is too rough-and-ready for me. He doesn't know how to act around civilized people.

rough and tumble

Disorderly scuffling or infighting, as in She had some reservations about entering the rough and tumble of local politics. This expression originated in the late 1700s in boxing, where it referred to a fight without rules. [Mid-1800s]
See also: and, rough, tumble

rough and tumble

COMMON You use rough and tumble to mean a situation in which there is a lot of arguing or competition and people do not worry about upsetting or harming others. Whoever expected leaders in the rough and tumble of electoral politics to be nice or fair? Note: You can use rough-and-tumble before a noun. He started his political career in the rough-and-tumble world of student politics. Note: You usually use this expression when you think that this is normal or acceptable behaviour. Note: Originally, a rough and tumble was a boxing match in which there were no rules or restrictions.
See also: and, rough, tumble

rough and tumble

a situation without rules or organization; a free-for-all.
The expression originated in 19th-century boxing slang.
See also: and, rough, tumble

rough and ˈtumble


1 a situation in which people compete with each other and are aggressive in order to get what they want: In the rough and tumble of politics you can’t trust anyone.
2 a noisy but not serious fight: The toddlers often join in the rough and tumble of the older children’s games.
See also: and, rough, tumble

rough and tumble

mod. disorderly; aggressive. George is too rough and tumble for me. He doesn’t know how to act around civilized people.
See also: and, rough, tumble

rough and tumble

Violent and disorderly action; a fight without rules. This early nineteenth-century Americanism may have originated in boxing—at least it was so defined by John Bartlett in 1859, although his work antedated the Queensberry rules of the ring by some years, and most boxing was of the rough-and-tumble variety. Nevertheless, the term was generally applied only to physical fights of various kinds until the second half of the century, when it began to be used more figuratively. Oliver Wendell Holmes (The Poet at the Breakfast-Table, 1872) wrote “That circle of rough-and-tumble political life.”
See also: and, rough, tumble
References in periodicals archive ?
Armed with chairs and chalkboards, the actresses give their history lesson at La Val's Subterranean Theatre, in the basement of a pizza parlor--a tiny venue perfect for Rough and Tumble's populist style.
"We were glad to be hosted by Rough and Tumble during their annual Threshermen's Reunion," explains Bill Rudicill, ACMOC president.
This qualitative study examines primary school-age boys participating in "rough and tumble" play and the ways in which the boys expressed care and intimacy as a result of their interactions.
We try to spend as much time as possible playing with him when we are at home but the trouble is my husband will only play rough and tumble games with him and nothing else.
The plaintiff did not in these circumstances consent to the conduct as the rough and tumble of sport and the defendant's conduct was reckless of the consequences of the collision he deliberately caused.
The joke, of course, rests on the juxtaposition between Beauty (who would never really get into the rough and tumble of ice hockey) and the Beasts.
But while Hollywood celebrities embrace the rough and tumble of partisan (usually left-ofcenter) politics, Hollywood movies usually shun ideology and porttray the world of politics as grubby and futile.
CELTIC winger Niall McGinn says he's learned to cope with the rough and tumble of the SPL thanks to Gaelic football.
Liverpool FC fan John Benson, QC, who is a member of Atlantic Chambers, said the "rough and tumble" of the game was leading to more and more claims for damages by players.
BIRMINGHAM'S head of education today urged schools to "stand up to the compensation culture" and encourage children to play traditional rough and tumble games like British bulldog, stuck in the mud and tag at breaktime.
The 40-year-old constable told police the four-inch stainless steel knife "slipped from my grasp" during some rough and tumble play.
The Spanish keeper, who has now gone 10 successive matches without conceding a goal after yesterday's victory over Middlesbrough, is adamant that coping with the rough and tumble of British football means he is now tougher than ever.
Originally from Newcastle, Roland has lived in Atherstone since the late 1950s, and is a regular spectator of the rough and tumble of the game.
Heart-pounding races are a worthy climax, with real-time 3D graphics showing off frenetic rough and tumble.
Rough And Tumble finished a further four lengths away in third spot.