rise from the ashes

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rise from the ashes

To emerge renewed, revitalized, or reborn as something different following some total destruction or ruin. A reference to the mythical phoenix, a bird that in many stories bursts into flames upon its death, being born again among the ashes. Over the next few years, a new tower rose from the ashes of the heinous attack, standing as a monument of the country's strength and pride. The company quietly faded into obscurity following its bankruptcy in the late '90s, but now that it has been purchased by the billionaire CEO, it has begun rising from the ashes like the phoenix.
See also: ash, rise

rise from the ashes

Fig. [for a structure] to be rebuilt after destruction. The entire west section of the city was destroyed and a group of new buildings rose from the ashes in only a few months. Will the city rise again from the ashes? No one knows.
See also: ash, rise

rise from the ashes

Emerge as new from something that has been destroyed, as in A few months after the earthquake large sections of the city had risen from the ashes. This expression alludes to the legendary phoenix, a bird that supposedly rose from the ashes of its funeral pyre with renewed youth.
See also: ash, rise

rise from the ashes

be renewed after destruction.
In classical mythology, the phoenix was a unique bird resembling an eagle that lived for five or six centuries in the Arabian desert. After this time it burned itself on a funeral pyre ignited by the sun and fanned by its own wings and was then born again from the ashes with renewed youth to live through another cycle of life. The simile like a phoenix from the ashes is used of someone or something that has made a fresh start after apparently experiencing total destruction.
See also: ash, rise

ˌrise from the ˈashes

become successful or powerful again after defeat or destruction: Can a new party rise from the ashes of the old one?This idiom refers to the story of the phoenix, a mythological bird which burns to death and then rises from the ashes to be born again.
See also: ash, rise
References in periodicals archive ?
The title of Koast's painting is "The Phoenix," named from the great bird that rose from the ashes. A limited-edition print of the painting is available in an edition of 500, and proceeds will be donated to the Bravest Fund, a charity that was set up by the three firemen in the scene.
But the phoenix that rose from the ashes is frequently condemned as ``unfortunate development'' so typical of the 1950s.
The SETI Institute is now halfway through a survey of 1,000 nearby sunlike stars, Project Phoenix--so named because it rose from the ashes of a NASA-sponsored program that was canceled in 1993.
Like the Phoenix that rose from the ashes, an innovative concept in capitalization and mortgage financing is catching fire and taking off, out of the flames of a depressed real estate market.
The Minoan civilization of ancient Crete literally rose from the ashes, accoding to new evidence.
Surrealism rose from the ashes of Dada, with some of the same names reappearing--DuChamp, Picabia, Arp, Ernst.