roost

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cock of the roost

An arrogant, conceited, or overly proud person, typically a man. He struts around campus like he's the cock of the roost, all because his dad is some politician.
See also: cock, of, roost

curses, like chickens, come home to roost

One's previous actions will eventually have consequences or cause problems. Aw man, I knew not handing in my homework would be a problem eventually. Curses, like chickens, come home to roost, after all. I'd be careful before making any rash decisions—you know that curses, like chickens, come home to roost.
See also: come, home, like, roost

chickens come home to roost

One's previous actions will eventually have consequences or cause problems. I knew not handing in my homework would be a problem eventually. Chickens always come home to roost. I'd be careful before making any rash decisions—you know that chickens come home to roost.
See also: chicken, come, home, roost

come home to roost

1. Literally, of chickens and other such birds, to return to an established place of shelter. Put out some feed because the chickens will come home to roost.
2. To cause problems or have consequences as a result of previous actions. I knew not handing in my homework would be a problem eventually—stuff like that always comes home to roost. I'd be careful before making any rash decisions because they always come home to roost.
See also: come, home, roost

rule the roost

To be the real boss; to be the person in charge. You just need to accept that your daughter is going to rule the roost for most of her childhood. For all intents and purposes, it's the assistant manager who rules the roost.
See also: roost, rule

chickens come home to roost

Prov. You have to face the consequences of your mistakes or bad deeds. Jill: Emily found out that I said she was incompetent, and now she won't recommend me for that job. Jane: The chickens have come home to roost, I see.
See also: chicken, come, home, roost

rule the roost

Fig. to be the boss or manager, especially at home. Who rules the roost at your house? Our new office manager really rules the roost.
See also: roost, rule

chickens come home to roost

The consequences of doing wrong always catch up with the wrongdoer, as in Now that you're finally admitting your true age, no one believes you-chickens come home to roost . The fact that chickens usually come home to rest and sleep has long been known, but the idea was used figuratively only in 1809, when Robert Southey wrote, "Curses are like young chickens, they always come home to roost" ( The Curse of Kehama).
See also: chicken, come, home, roost

rule the roost

Be in charge, boss others, as in In our division the chairman's son rules the roost. This expression originated in the 15th century as rule the roast, which was either a corruption of rooster or alluded to the person who was in charge of the roast and thus ran the kitchen. In the barnyard a rooster decides which hen should roost near him. Both interpretations persisted for 200 years. Thomas Heywood (c. 1630) put it as "Her that ruled the roast in the kitchen," but Shakespeare had it in 2 Henry VI (1:1): "The new-made duke that rules the roast," which is more ambiguous. In the mid-1700s roost began to compete with roast, and in the 1900s roost displaced roast altogether. Also see run the show.
See also: roost, rule

come home to roost

COMMON If something bad that someone did comes home to roost, it now causes problems for them. You ought to have known that your lies would come home to roost in the end. Mr Cardoso's failures as a minister have finally come home to roost. Note: You can also say the chickens come home to roost, with the same meaning. Politicians can fool some people some of the time, but in the end, the chickens will come home to roost. Note: This expression is taken from the poem `The Curse of Kehama' by the English poet Robert Southey: `Curses are like young chickens, they always come home to roost.'
See also: come, home, roost

rule the roost

COMMON
1. If someone rules the roost, they are the most powerful and important person in a group. In Germany, scientists will be found at the top of many manufacturing companies; in Britain, accountants rule the roost. Unfortunately he's a weak manager who lets the players rule the roost when he's meant to be in charge.
2. If something rules the roost it is more powerful or popular than the things that it is being compared to. Today, the cartels still rule the roost and the authorities seem as impotent as ever. Note: This expression seems to refer to the dominant cock in a chicken coop. However, `rule the roost' may have developed from the earlier expression `rule the roast', which refers to the head of the household who carves and serves the meat.
See also: roost, rule

chickens come home to roost

your past mistakes or wrongdoings will eventually be the cause of present troubles.
This phrase comes from the proverb curses, like chickens, come home to roost .
1997 Arundhati Roy The God of Small Things He knew, had known, that one day History's twisted chickens would come home to roost.
See also: chicken, come, home, roost

rule the roost

be in complete control.
The original expression was rule the roast , which was common from the mid 16th century onwards. Although none of the early examples of its use shed any light on its source, we can surmise that it originally referred to someone being the most important person at a banquet or feast. Rule the roost, found from the mid 18th century, has now replaced the earlier version.
See also: roost, rule

(your/the) chickens come home to ˈroost

after a long time you experience the unpleasant effects of something bad or stupid that you have done in the past: For years he avoided paying tax. But now his chickens have come home to roost and he’s got a tax bill of $25 000.
Roost is used about birds and means ‘to rest or go to sleep somewhere’.
See also: chicken, come, home, roost

rule the ˈroost

(informal) be the person who controls a group, family, community, etc: It is a family firm, where the owner’s mother rules the roost.
A roost is a place where birds sleep.
See also: roost, rule

come home to roost

To have repercussions or aftereffects, especially unfavorable ones: The consequences of your mistake will eventually come home to roost.
See also: come, home, roost

rule the roost

Informal
To be in charge; dominate: In this house my parents rule the roost.
See also: roost, rule

chickens come home to roost, one's

One’s sins or mistakes always catch up with one. The idea of retribution is, of course, very old, recorded in ancient Greek and Roman writings. Virgil’s Aeneid, for example, has it, “Now do thy sinful deeds come home to thee.” This particular turn of phrase, however, appears to have been invented by the English poet Robert Southey, who wrote it as a motto in The Curse of Kehama (1809): “Curses are like young chickens; they always come home to roost.”
See also: chicken, come, home

rule the roost, to

To be the boss. This term originated as rule the roast in the fifteenth century. Possibly it even then referred to the rooster, who decides which hen should roost near him. On the other hand, Thomas Heywood, in his History of Women (ca. 1630), stated, “Her that ruled the roast in the kitchen,” so perhaps it did mean whoever held sway over the kitchen, the heart of a household. Shakespeare used it more broadly, however. In Henry VI, Part 2 (1.1) he refers to “the new-made duke that rules the roast.” In any event, it has been used for bossing anything from a family to an entire nation.
See also: rule
References in periodicals archive ?
We captured bats at 2 established maternity roosts that were accessible by road in the Fairbanks area.
Although turkeys, especially the smaller heritage types, are very good fliers, their roosts should not be placed too high up.
Many Indiana bats appeared to be using barns as night roosts.
One building may host multiple species of bats, or multiple roosts and within a single perceived roost there may be several smaller roosts of varying temperature and microclimate which individuals regularly move around depending on their physiological requirements.
The solar panels at the bat houses will provide some warmth which will hopefully attract bats looking for new roosts.
We recognise that some flying fox roosts in built-up areas need intervention to protect residents from nuisance impacts such as smell and noise.
2), through to roosts within close proximity to densely foliaged plants such as Rough Tree Fern Cyathea australis and Tall Saw-sedge.
MATERIALS AND METHODS--We sampled six summer roosts containing free-tailed bats in central Texas during winter (November, December, January, and February) 2010-2011 and 2011-2012.
Roosts used by maternity colonies of silver-haired bats in northeastern Oregon.
The lesser horseshoe bat roost is in the attic of Nantclwyd y Dre.
Indeed, many people regard having a roost in their loft space as something of a privilege, and go to considerable lengths to make their small furry guests as welcome as possible.
Most bats use a variety of roosts including man-made structures (Kunz 1982; Fenton 2001).
The onlyl other confirmed roost locations arer in Laugharne, Carmarthenshirer and Margamr Park near Port Talbot.
DOZENS of bats are feared to have died in an arson attack on their roost.
Since this species often roosts in buildings, they are particularly vulnerable to renovation of old buildings and remedial timber treatments," he said.