rooky


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rookie

1. noun Someone who is inexperienced at some sport, profession, or other activity. Sometimes used as a term of address. It was the first playoff game for the rookie, and he managed to score three runs with a home run in the very first inning. I can't believe they're making me take the rookie out on the beat today. Nice one, rookie. You just cost us a day's worth of work.
2. adjective Of, related to, or indicating a very inexperience person. The rookie officer was tasked with protecting the suspect while he was transferred to the county jail. I can't believe I let that error slip by me during testing. What a rookie mistake!
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

rookie

and rooky (ˈrʊki)
1. n. a person new at something; a neophyte, especially a police officer or a ballplayer. The rookie tackled the old-time player and earned a lot of cheering and applause.
2. mod. new; inexperienced. Fred is a rookie first baseman for the home team.

rooky

verb
See rookie
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
He is looking forward to 2011 with the flush of excitement normally associated with a bright young rooky.
The guild has compiled a list of dozens of would-be colleagues, including former assistants to DPJ lawmakers and people from the private sector, for referral to rooky party lawmakers, he said.
It remains to be seen whether Gibbo will allow another rooky manager to take us to the edge of the cliff and relegation."
The 27-year-old rooky lefty blew a five-run lead in his return to the rotation on Friday as the Seattle Mariners outslugged the Yankees 15-11 at Yankee Stadium.
Thus crows, for Wilson, are a code for Jesuits in Shakespeare's works--and indeed, out of them as well, for he mentions Robert Greene's early rejection of Shakespeare as "a crow beautified with our feathers" in this context (11) and links it with the crow that "Makes wing to th' rooky wood" in Macbeth, as an allusion to the Jesuit Henry Garnet, and with the crows who "are fatted with the murrain flock" in Midsummer Night's Dream, as "a sour pun on Jesuit infiltration of the church for which More had died" (12-13).
Since Jesuits were caricatured by Protestant polemicists as "massing crows," "the picture of the Jesuit 'black-robe' as a carrion crow was one which Shakespeare would himself use to dissociate from papist terrorism, when he wrote of the evil hour when 'the crow / Makes wing to th' rooky wood' (Macbeth 3.3.51-52) in denunciation of the Masses hosted by the conspirator Ambrose Rookwood at Clopton House, near Stratford, in the darkening days before the Gunpowder Plot" (12).
Widnes could not have made a worse start, with rooky Paul O'Connor's blunder from the kick-off allowing Dobson to find Bruno Verges in acres of space for the first of his side's six touchdowns.
Spennymoor held out until the hour when Simon Barraclough scored from close range and in the 82nd minute the game was put beyond doubt when Rooky White went up unchallenged to head past Darren Harrigan.
She has paired her with fellow rooky Anne Laing against Wie and Brittany Lang in the first day foursomes at Formby today.
The Vice (ITV1Wales,9pm) Mel Raido, whop lays rooky PC Adam Parkes, spends much of the new series going deep undercover.
Then Branch tapped the ball home under the keeper from three yards when defender Reeves failed to cut out rooky striker Wilbraham's thrust.
Today, however, I sense Taylor's presence in the Keatsian `shrilly' and in the see-sawing, Augustan effect of the counterpoised epithets which eclipse two Clare-like features of the original lines: the contrast, reminiscent of Macbeth's crow making wing to the rooky wood, between the loner and the crowd; and the rhythmic approximation to the kite's movement.