rode


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ride (one's) luck

To find success through fortune or chance rather than through one's own agency or risk-taking. (Used especially in reference to sporting events.) Primarily heard in UK. Cheltenham has been riding their luck lately, winning their last two games on penalty kicks alone, but they'll need to step up their game if they hope to have a place in the championship.
See also: luck, ride

ride (someone's) ass

1. To frequently or constantly harass, nag, or upbraid someone to do, accomplish, or complete something. The boss is riding everyone's ass to get the project finished by next week. Quit riding my ass, I'll get it done eventually!
2. To tailgate, i.e. to follow unnecessarily closely behind another vehicle while driving. I wish that trucker wouldn't ride my ass down this hill.
See also: ass, ride

ride (someone's) back

To frequently or constantly harass, nag, or upbraid someone to do, accomplish, or complete something. The boss is riding everyone's back to get the project finished by next week. Quit riding my back, I'll get it done eventually!
See also: back, ride

ride (someone's) butt

To frequently or constantly harass, nag, or upbraid someone to do, accomplish, or complete something. The boss is riding everyone's butt to get the project finished by next week. Quit riding my butt, I'll get it done eventually!
See also: butt, ride

ride tall in the/(one's) saddle

To be or remain proud, stoical, or august in one's manner or composure. Even after two years of a losing war, the general still rode tall in his saddle before his troops. I'll have nothing to do with your schemes or plot. One day, you're going to be locked up and lose everything, and I'll be riding tall in the saddle when you do.
See also: ride, saddle, tall

ride (on) the coattails of (someone)

To benefit from someone else's success; to use someone else's success as a means to achieve one's own. Everyone knows you've been riding on the coattails of the governor these last two years, but once her term ends, you'll be on your own! Jonathan rode the coattails of his professor to get some recognition for his own work in several esteemed academic journals.
See also: coattail, of, ride

ride the pine

In sports (especially baseball), to remain sitting on the bench, rather than be an active participant in the game. Primarily heard in US. I'm not going to play next year if coach makes me ride the pine again this season. I rode the pine for the rest of the game after I pulled my hamstring sliding to first base.
See also: pine, ride

ride (on) the wave (of something)

To enjoy the advantage or benefit of a particularly successful, popular, fortunate, interesting, etc., moment or period of time. Jonathan has been riding the wave of his sister's celebrity ever since she was cast in that blockbuster film series. The popular Internet artist has ridden the wave of support from her fan base to launch an incredibly successful crowd funding campaign for a new project. Ever since I won the lottery, everybody has been really friendly to me, and I've just been riding the wave ever since!
See also: ride, wave

ride with the punches

1. Literally, in martial arts (especially boxing), to maneuver one's body away from a blow so as to lessen the force of its impact. He's not the most aggressive fighter—instead, he relies on his endurance and skill, riding with the punches to wear down his opponent until the best moment to strike.
2. By extension, to adapt to setbacks, difficulties, or adversity so as to better manage or cope with their impact on one's life. (Note: This phrase is a less common variant of the phrase "roll with the punches," which carries the same literal and figurative meanings.) Losing my job was really tough, but I've just been trying to ride with the punches until I get back on my feet. I learned that my grandfather passed away right before my final exams in college, but I just rode with the punches and did the best that I could.
See also: punch, ride

ride on a rail

To be punished harshly, often publicly, and perhaps culminating in exile. The phrase originally referred to a punishment in which a wrongdoer was paraded around town on a rail and then exiled. Now that this scandal is public knowledge, I'm afraid that I'm going to ride on a rail before it's all over.
See also: on, rail, ride

ride shanks' mare

To walk. "Shanks" refers to one's legs. The store is close enough that we don't need to drive, we can just ride shanks' mare.
See also: mare, ride

ride (on) a wave of (something)

To enjoy the advantage of or continue to benefit from a situation that is successful, fortunate, trendy, etc. Jonathan has been riding a wave of celebrity ever since he was cast in the leading role for the new blockbuster. The popular Internet artist has ridden a wave of support from her fanbase to launch an incredibly successful crowdfunding campaign for a new project.
See also: of, ride, wave

ride on (one's) coattails

To benefit from someone else's success; to use someone else's success as a means to achieve one's own. Everyone knows you've been riding on the governor's coattails for the last two years, but once her term ends you'll be on your own. Jonathan rode on the famous professor's coattails to get some recognition for his own work from several esteemed academic journals.
See also: coattail, on, ride

ride roughshod over (someone or something)

To treat someone or something with marked disdain, brutality, or contempt; to act without regard for the wellbeing of something or someone. In her ascent to the top of the political ladder, the senator rode roughshod over anyone who stood in her way. The new management team has ridden roughshod over the projects that we've been planning for months.
See also: over, ride, roughshod

ride (one's) coattails

To benefit from someone else's success; to use someone else's success as a means to achieve one's own. Everyone knows you've been riding the governor's coattails for the last two years, but once her term ends you'll be on your own. Jonathan rode the famous professor's coattails to get some recognition for his own work from several esteemed academic journals.
See also: coattail, ride

ride on the back of (something)

To use the popularity or success of an existing thing (typically something that one is not associated with) to achieve success with something new. All these knockoff superhero movies are clearly riding on the back of the original franchise. Joe is trying to ride on the back of the subscription meal movement to start his own small business. It's like Uber but for washing dishes.
See also: back, of, on, ride

ride out the storm

1. Literally, to remain at one's location during a storm to wait until it passes, as opposed to evacuating. Officials are urging residents not to try to ride out the storm. This is a mandatory evacuation event.
2. By extension, to endure a period of hardship or disorder. That was the hardest year of my life, but in the end I was able to ride out the storm with the support of my family.
See also: out, ride, storm

ride on

To continue to ride or travel onward (said or a vehicle or someone on a vehicle). I thought the bus was supposed to stop here, but it just rode on right past me. I know you want to stop somewhere before sundown, but let's ride on just a bit farther.
See also: on, ride

ride bodkin

obsolete To be squeezed tightly between two people while traveling, especially in a carriage. Pressed for time ahead of his appointment, the Duke was rather unceremoniously obliged to ride bodkin between the two daughters of his host.
See also: bodkin, ride

ride (off) into the sunset

To resolve or conclude things in a neat, happy, and satisfactory fashion; to retire from work, use, or relevance, especially on a positive note or after a long and successful period of activity. An allusion to the clichéd endings of western movies, often showing the main characters riding horseback into the sunset at the conclusion of the film. Often used sarcastically, ironically, or humorously. Despite the turbulence in the first few years, the president is now riding off into the sunset with a huge approval rating and a whole host of policies enacted under his watch. I'm tired of comedies that see everyone just ride into the sunset at the end. How about showing some realistic consequences for the things these types of characters do?
See also: ride, sunset

ride the crest of (something)

To be experiencing a particularly joyous or successful period, situation, or event. The senator rode the crest of renewed enthusiasm among his party to a huge victory in the election. Riding the crest of his recent promotion, John set to work designing something really remarkable. The champion will has his work cut out for him against the underdog, who is currently riding the crest of a five-bout winning streak.
See also: crest, of, ride

ride the lightning

To be put to death by means of the electric chair. Primarily heard in US. Scores of inmates rode the lightning while he was warden of the prison. We're going to make sure you ride the lightning for what you've done!
See also: lightning, ride

ride two horses at once

To do (or attempt to do) two or more things simultaneously, often when those things conflict or are at odds with one another. The prime minister is clearly riding two horses at once—trying to fulfill his promises to the public to lower taxes, while also trying to find the money to help the country's struggling economy. When I was a younger actor, I was constantly riding two horses at once, taking on as many roles as I could—even if they overlapped.
See also: horse, once, ride, two

ride two horses at the same time

To do (or attempt to do) two or more things simultaneously, often when those things conflict or are at odds with one another. The prime minister is clearly riding two horses at the same time—trying to fulfill his promises to the public to lower taxes, while also trying to find the money to help the country's struggling economy. When I was a younger actor, I was constantly riding two horses at the same time, taking on as many roles as I could—even if they overlapped.
See also: horse, ride, same, time, two

ride on

to continue to ride, traveling onward. We rode on for at least an hour before finding a rest stop. They rode on for a while.
See also: on, ride

ride on something

 
1. Lit. to travel on something. Do you like to ride on the train? I have never ridden on a horse.
2. Fig. to be borne on something and carried along. (On something other than a means of transportation.) She rode on a wave of popularity to reelection. He rode on his past laurels as long as he could.
See also: on, ride

ride (up)on someone or something

to use someone or something as a beast of burden. (Upon is formal and less commonly used than on.) As a game, the children used to ride on their father. We rode upon burros along the narrow mountain trails.
See also: on, ride

ride two horses at the same time

or

ride two horses at once

BRITISH, JOURNALISM
If someone rides two horses at the same time or rides two horses at once, they try to do two things that cannot happen or be done at the same time. Above all, do not think you can ride two horses at the same time. You are either in business or you are a minister. You cannot be both. In trying to be friends with both sides, Britain was attempting to ride two horses at once.
See also: horse, ride, same, time, two

ride bodkin

travel squeezed between two other people. dated
See also: bodkin, ride

ride the lightning

be executed in the electric chair. US informal
See also: lightning, ride

ride the pine (or bench)

(of an athlete) not participate in a game or event, typically because of poor form. North American informal
See also: pine, ride

ride on

v.
1. To travel on something: She rode on a bicycle. He rode on a horse all around the ranch.
2. To continue traveling onward: Some of the cyclists stopped by the river to rest, but others rode on. The trucker rode on to Chicago.
3. To be contingent upon something or someone for an outcome; depend on something or someone: Whether or not I go to college rides on my getting a scholarship.
4. To make progress by virtue of something: I was able to ride on my past achievements to secure the promotion.
See also: on, ride

rode hard and put away wet

mod. misused; ill-used. (Alludes to the mistreatment of a horse.) Bad day at the office. I was rode hard and put away wet.
See also: and, away, hard, put, rode, wet
References in periodicals archive ?
I love this,'' Villaraigosa said as he rode up the dusty trail on a Los Angeles Police Department Mounted Patrol horse named Tom.
When I was 20 years old I could come in an hour before I rode, didn't have to stretch or do anything to get ready.
Missed one,'' Justin said quietly as he rode past me in a dry river bed in the middle of nowhere.
Wylie, who teaches third and fourth grade at Lockhurst Drive Elementary School in Woodland Hills, rode his unicycle for his pupils at a Halloween party dressed as a clown.
On Friday and Saturday, Flaharty rode on the Great American Scream Machine at a Six Flags in Atlanta for 30 hours - that's 367 laps.
O'Neal rode with the other motorcyclists through the Santa Monica Mountains to Duke's Malibu Restaurant on the beach, where he parted with the group and continued on his own.
He and Checkos rode on a 1989 Harley-Davidson Softail he bought after being unable to resist the lure of sharing a throttle and an open road with friends.
In April 1999, on what Krone had announced would be her last day in competition, she rode three winners at Lone Star Park near Dallas to bring her career total to a female-record 3,545.
We rode in last night from the Antelope Valley, and it was raining,'' Middleton, 46, said.
Day rode Buddha in the Wood Memorial and will ride him in the Derby.
D'Amico regularly rode Harlan's Holiday and Repent before being abruptly replaced by Prado and Bailey as trainer Ken McPeek homed in on the Derby.
Valenzuela was 17 when he won the Santa Anita Derby in 1980 aboard 25-1 Codex, before losing the mount to the more accomplished Angel Cordero, who rode the colt to victory in the Preakness.
In between, he rode Echo Eddie to a close second in a million-dollar race called the Golden Shaheen.
Now he's walking on his own,'' said Ruth Ellis, who looked on as her son rode sidesaddle and backward before a crowd charmed by the toddler's charismatic cheers of `Hi
and rode David Hofmans-trained Millennium Wind to a 5 1/4-length victory over a field that included Derby hopefuls Songandaprayer, Dollar Bill, Invisible Ink and A P Valentine.