rocks


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rock

1. noun, slang A precious gem, especially a diamond. A: "Did you see that rock on her finger?" B: "Yeah, I didn't know she was engaged!" The rocks in that necklace are worth nearly a million dollars.
2. noun Rock music, a genre of music characterized by the use of the electric guitar and bass. A shortened form of "rock and roll," from which it originated. I was into rock when I was in high school, but now I'm more into electronic music. The bar always blasts rock at such a high volume that I can never hear what anyone is saying.
3. noun, slang An ice cube. Typically used in the plural. I'd like a whiskey on the rocks, please.
4. noun, vulgar slang A testicle. Almost always used figuratively to mean confidence, courage, bravado, etc. Exclusively used in the plural. You've got some rocks on you to stand up to the boss like that, kid.
5. noun, slang A piece of crack cocaine. Typically used in the plural. Denny got caught selling rocks and got hit with a mandatory minimum.
6. adjective Pertaining to rock music. This is my favorite rock station on the radio. The band surprised its fans when it announced that its next album would be a rock opera.
7. verb To perform rock music, especially skillfully or with great energy and enthusiasm. My days of going on stage to rock are behind me at this point. Don't worry about the audience. Just go out there and rock.
8. verb To dance or move along to rock music or a similar genre. This song really gets me rocking!
9. verb, slang To be excellent or awesome. You got me my favorite doughnut! You rock! I can't believe you didn't like that movie! It rocked! Wow, you got into your dream school! That rocks!

rocks

1. n. ice cubes. Can I have a few rocks in my drink, please?
2. n. Xerox Inc. (Securities markets, New York Stock Exchange.) When she says, “Buy me a thousand rocks at the market,” that means she wants one thousand shares of Xerox at whatever the market price is at the moment.
3. n. money; a dollar. (Underworld.) Twenty rocks for that?
4. n. the testicles. (see also stones. Usually objectionable.) I was afraid I’d get kicked in the rocks, so I stayed back.
See also: rock
References in classic literature ?
"Oh, yes," said Dorothy, now observing for the first time the crack in the rock. "And isn't this a key-hole, Billina?" pointing to a round, deep hole at one side of the door.
He placed a finger in his mouth, and drew a long, shrill whistle, which was answered from the rocks that were guarded by the Mohicans.
The place of the interview between Miss Temple and the Indian has already been described as one of those plat forms of rock, which form a sort of terrace in the mountains of that country, and the face of it, we have said, was both high and perpendicular.
From above it seemed as though rope and cliff were well-nigh touching, but now, when swinging a hundred feet down, the squire found that he could scarce reach the face of the rock with his foot, and that it was as smooth as glass, with no resting-place where a mouse could stand.
After an hour's painful progress, we reached the verge of another fall, still loftier than the preceding and flanked both above and below with the same steep masses of rock, presenting, however, here and there narrow irregular ledges, supporting a shallow soil, on which grew a variety of bushes and trees, whose bright verdure contrasted beautifully with the foamy waters that flowed between them.
"Wonder if this works with strings," said Dorothy; but Polychrome cried "Look!" for another creature just like the first had suddenly appeared sitting on another rock, its black side toward them.
All that Edmond had been able to do was to drag himself about a dozen paces forward to lean against a moss-grown rock.
A little after, as I was jumping about after my limpets, I was startled by a guinea-piece, which fell upon a rock in front of me and glanced off into the sea.
As for you, coxswain, these are your orders; attend to them, for the ship is in your hands; turn her head away from these steaming rapids and hug the rock, or she will give you the slip and be over yonder before you know where you are, and you will be the death of us.'
The smallest rock in the tropical seas, by giving a foundation for the growth of innumerable kinds of seaweed and compound animals, supports likewise a large number of fish.
At the distance of a mile and a half from the foot of this narrow channel is a rapid, formed by two rocky islands; and two miles beyond is a second great fall, over a ledge of rocks twenty feet high, extending nearly from shore to shore.
It was with difficulty held to the rocks by a boat hook, for the current rushed furiously round the point.
Nell, I say;--I hope it is an army of red-skins she has in her eye; for I should relish the chance to pay them for their kindness, under the favour of these logs and rocks!"
When she stole softly to the edge of the lagoon she might see them by the score, especially on Marooners' Rock, where they loved to bask, combing out their hair in a lazy way that quite irritated her; or she might even swim, on tiptoe as it were, to within a yard of them, but then they saw her and dived, probably splashing her with their tails, not by accident, but intentionally.
I see a great, great rock in front of us--look--way out there where the sky and the water meet.