rocket into

rocket into (something or some place)

1. To move or travel into some place incredibly quickly, as if being propelled by rockets. The puck rocketed into the net from the middle of the rink. Chunks of metal and glass rocketed into the air as the bomb exploded.
2. To cause someone or something to travel into some place incredibly quickly, as if being propelled by rockets. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "rocket" and "into." The out-of-control car hit a pedestrian, rocketing the poor woman into the air. The player kicked the ball and rocketed it into the back of the net.
3. To move into some position or status with remarkable speed. With three goals in quick succession, the underdog team suddenly rocketed into the lead. The singer rocketed into the limelight this year with the huge success of his debut album.
4. To move someone or something into some position or status with remarkable speed. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "rocket" and "into." The incredible sales of the company's newest product has rocketed them into a position of market dominance. The huge growth of her wealth over the past year rocketed her into the top ten list of the most wealthy individuals.
See also: rocket

rocket something into something

to send something somewhere-usually into space-by rocket. The government rocketed the satellite into space. Someone suggested rocketing our waste into space.
See also: rocket
References in classic literature ?
At the same instant I saw him raise his hand and at the signal I tossed my rocket into the room with a cry of "Fire!" The word was no sooner out of my mouth than the whole crowd of spectators, well dressed and ill--gentlemen, ostlers, and servant-maids--joined in a general shriek of "Fire!" Thick clouds of smoke curled through the room and out at the open window.
Indeed, most of the difficult parts of the car design, such as the aerodynamics and packaging the rocket into Bloodhound's tightly packed chassis, are being handled by Bloodhound's engineers.
The ground trial marks the first time the APKWS technology, which transforms a standard unguided 2.75-inch (70-millimeter) rocket into a precision laser-guided weapon, has been demonstrated on a Forges de Zeebrugge (FZ) rocket.
Japan sends a rocket into space using a low-cost rocket coordinated from a laptop computer.
This September, Mayback, a registered patent attorney with a degree in engineering, partnered with Derek Deville, a former client and development engineer for Syntheon, a medical equipment manufacturer in Miami, to launch a 26-foot tall civilian rocket into the late summer sky.
People tried it years ago but couldn't get the wax to work well enough to launch a heavy rocket into space.