roar at

roar at (someone or something)

1. To utter a loud, fierce, guttural cry at someone or some animal. The little boy came up and roared at me. He was pretending to be a lion, apparently. The bear roared at the mountain lion to scare it away from her cubs.
2. To issue forth a loud prolonged cry in celebration of something. The crowd roared at the news that their candidate had won the election. The group of fans roared at the mention of the famous artist's name.
3. To laugh uproariously at some humorous person or thing. The entire audience was roaring at the stand-up comic, but I just didn't think he was that funny. It makes me happy to hear my kids roar at the slapstick of The Three Stooges.
See also: roar

roar at someone or something

 
1. Lit. to bellow or bawl at someone or something. Don't roar at me! Control your temper. The lion roared at the hyena, who ran off.
2. Fig. to laugh very hard at someone or something. The audience roared at the clown. The children roared at Dad's jokes.
See also: roar
References in classic literature ?
Save for himself, the arena was deserted, although, overhead, suspended from the roof-bars, were block-and-tackle and seven strong iron chairs that drew his instant suspicion and caused him to roar at them.
They promised to make the Scottish lion roar at Westminster.
We were trying to correct a previous assumption that lions and tigers roar at low fundamental frequencies because they have a huge vocal folds," says study co-author Tobias Riede, a research assistant professor of biology at the University of Utah and a research associate at the National Center for Voice and Speech.
ROAR at Vision, Queen Street, is cranking up the tempo for its birthday party next week, when Lisa Lashes will grace the decks.