risk

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at (one's) own risk

Done with the foreknowledge or forewarning that there is implied risk or danger which one must accept as one's own responsibility. When you choose to gamble, you do so at your own risk.
See also: own, risk

calculated risk

A risky action that has been carefully considered beforehand, in which the chance or likelihood of a beneficial outcome outweighs the risk or cost of failure. We decided to take the calculated risk of going to trial, rather than settling out of court.
See also: calculated, risk

take a risk

To try to do something for which there is a high probability of a negative or unfortunate outcome. I'm taking a real risk hiring this guy, so you had better be right about him. You're never going to find real success unless you're willing to take a risk now and then.
See also: risk, take

at risk

1. In danger. Well, when you're involved in a pyramid scheme, you're at risk for losing a lot of money. Because I have poor vision, I'm worried that my daughter is at risk for it too.
2. Responsible for a cost or expense. If you sign this contract, you'll be at risk for a lot of fees.
See also: risk

take a chance

To try to do something that has a high probability of having a negative or unfortunate outcome. I'm taking a real chance hiring this guy, so you had better be right about him. You're never going to find real success unless you're willing to take a chance now and then.
See also: chance, take

risk life and limb

To do something that might cause severe injury or death. Today we pay our respects to the brave men and women who risk life and limb every day to keep our country safe. I'm sure it's thrilling, but I'd rather not risk life and limb just for a bit of an adrenaline rush.
See also: and, life, limb, risk

risk (one's) neck

To do something that might cause severe injury or death. Today we pay our respects to the brave men and women who risk their necks every day to keep our country safe. I'm sure it's thrilling, but I'd rather not risk my neck just for a bit of an adrenaline rush.
See also: neck, risk

run the risk

To subject oneself to a particular risk or high probability of a negative or unfortunate outcome. You always run the risk of upsetting your most loyal fans if you try to do something too innovative with subsequent films. I'd love to pay less taxes, but I'm not going to run the risk of going to jail for it!
See also: risk, run

run a risk

To subject oneself to a particular risk or high probability of a negative or unfortunate outcome. You always run a risk of upsetting your most loyal fans if you try to do something too innovative with subsequent films. I'd love to pay less taxes, but I'm not going to run a risk by doing so!
See also: risk, run

*at risk

in a situation where there is risk or hazard; in danger. (*Typically: be ~; put someone or something ~.) I refuse to put my family's welfare at risk by quitting my job. Your whole future is at risk if you don't stop smoking.
See also: risk

risk of rain

 and risk of showers; risk of thunder(-storms)
a chance of precipitation. (Used only in weather forecasting. There is no "risk" of hazard or injury involved.) And for tomorrow, there is a slight risk of showers in the morning. There is a 50 percent risk of rain tonight.
See also: of, rain, risk

risk one's neck (to do something)

Fig. to accept the risk of physical harm in order to accomplish something. Look at that traffic! I refuse to risk my neck just to cross the street to buy a paper. I refuse to risk my neck at all.
See also: neck, risk

risk something on someone or something

to chance losing something on someone or something. I wouldn't risk any money on him. He's a poor credit risk. Don't risk your life on his being there to help you.
See also: on, risk

run a risk (of something)

 and run the risk (of something)
to take a chance that something (bad) will happen. I don't want to run the risk of losing my job. Don't worry. You won't have to run a risk.
See also: risk, run

run the risk

(of something) Go to run a risk (of something).
See also: risk, run

take a chance

 and take a risk
to try something where failure or bad fortune is likely. Come on, take a chance. You may lose, but it's worth trying. I'm not reckless, but I don't mind taking a risk now and then.
See also: chance, take

at risk

1. In danger, as in Their house's location on the San Andreas Fault puts them at risk in the next major earthquake . [c. 1900]
2. Legally responsible to pay for loss or damage, as in If he can't keep up with the insurance premiums, he is at risk for any liability claims on the property . [Late 1700s]
See also: risk

calculated risk

A chance taken after careful estimation of the probable outcome, as in Taking their dispute to arbitration was definitely a calculated risk. This term uses calculated in the sense of "planned with forethought," a usage from the mid-1800s. Its pairing with risk dates from World War II, when the chances for losing bombers were taken into account before a bombing mission was sent out. After the war the term was transferred to other undertakings where taking a chance to succeed had to be weighed against the costs of failure.
See also: calculated, risk

risk life and limb

Also, risk one's neck. Take dangerous chances, as in There he was on the roof, risking life and limb to rescue the kitten, or I don't want to risk my neck contradicting him. The first hyperbolic expression, dating from the early 1600s, doesn't make sense, since if one loses one's life one also loses the use of one's limbs. The variant, used for risky undertakings of all kinds, physical and nonphysical, presumably alludes to being hanged or beheaded. Also see stick one's neck out.
See also: and, life, limb, risk

run a risk

Also, run the risk. Be subjected to danger, as in Hiding anything from customs means running a risk that you'll be caught, or Without the right postage and address, this package runs the risk of being lost. [Mid-1600s]
See also: risk, run

take a chance

Risk something, gamble, as in I'll take a chance that he'll be on the next plane. [c. 1900]
See also: chance, take

risk life and limb

If you risk life and limb, you do something very dangerous that may cause you to die or be seriously injured. He is not prepared to risk life and limb on this dangerous track to win the title. She gets a thrill risking life and limb by leaping off cliffs and mountains.
See also: and, life, limb, risk

risk your neck

If you risk your neck, you do something dangerous which could cause you to die or be injured. I wasn't going to risk my neck in fast-flowing water to rescue a stupid cat. I won't have him risking his neck on that motorcycle.
See also: neck, risk

take a ˈchance (on something)

do something without being sure of success: We took a chance on being able to get tickets on the day of the match, but they were sold out.
See also: chance, take

at ˈrisk (from/of something)

in danger of something unpleasant or harmful happening: As with all diseases, certain groups will be more at risk than others.If we go to war, innocent lives will be put at risk.
See also: risk

at the ˈrisk of doing something

used to introduce something that may sound stupid or may offend somebody: At the risk of showing my ignorance, how exactly does the Internet work?
See also: of, risk, something

at risk to yourself/somebody/something

with the possibility of harming yourself/somebody/something: He dived in to save the child at considerable risk to his own life.
See also: risk, somebody, something

do something at your ˌown ˈrisk

do something even though you have been warned about the possible dangers and will have to take responsibility for anything bad that happens: Persons swimming beyond this point do so at their own risk (= on a notice).Valuables are left at their owner’s risk (= on a notice).
See also: own, risk, something

risk ˌlife and ˈlimb

risk being killed or injured in order to do something: She risked life and limb to save her son from the fire.
See also: and, life, limb, risk

risk your ˈneck

(informal) take a big risk by doing something dangerous, stupid, etc: I’m not going to risk my neck complaining about the boss. OPPOSITE: save somebody’s/your (own) neck/skin/hide
See also: neck, risk

run the ˈrisk (of doing something)

,

run ˈrisks

be or put yourself in a situation in which something bad could happen to you: We’d better give them what they want. We don’t want to run the risk of losing their business.Investment is all about running risks.
See also: risk, run

take a ˈrisk

,

take ˈrisks

do something even though you know that something bad could happen as a result: That’s a risk I’m not prepared to take.You have no right to take risks with other people’s money. OPPOSITE: play (it) safe
See also: risk, take

at risk

In an endangered state, especially from lack of proper care: unsupervised children who are at risk of dropping out of school.
See also: risk
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Among them are 29-year-old Heather King (pictured), from Runswick Bay, and James Risker, 27, from near Scarborough, both of whom work for the Purple Mountain Bike Centre in the forest.
The tenth goal was scored by a header from Mark Risker after another brilliant cross from Johnston.
DANIEL WOOD, ALEX BRYCE, ALI CRAFT, DAVID WALSH and CLAIRE RISKER, Office of Dr Ashok Kumar I HAVE known the late Ashok Kumar for a while and can honestly say he was one of the best in the business.