rise to (something)

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rise to (something)

To increase one's effort in response to a challenging situation. If you're going to lead this team, you've got to rise to the challenge and start motivating them. It was a tough act to follow, but the band rose to the occasion and played the best set of their career.
See also: rise
References in classic literature ?
The bowers whereat, in dreams, I see The wantonest singing birds Are lips - and all thy melody Of lip-begotten words -
To kill ME, did they strangle you, ye singing birds of my hopes
I am not sure that I ever heard the sound of cock-crowing from my clearing, and I thought that it might be worth the while to keep a cockerel for his music merely, as a singing bird.
The country abounded with aquatic and land birds, such as swans, wild geese, brant, ducks of almost every description, pelicans, herons, gulls, snipes, curlews, eagles, vultures, crows, ravens, magpies, woodpeckers, pigeons, partridges, pheasants, grouse, and a great variety of singing birds.
she says it's a pity to kill the pretty singing birds, but the naughty sparrows, and mice, and rats, I may do what I like with.
Skirting along the north fork for a day or two, excessively annoyed by musquitoes and buffalo gnats, they reached, in the evening of the 17th, a small but beautiful grove, from which issued the confused notes of singing birds, the first they had heard since crossing the boundary of Missouri.
They was married, and they live fower hundred mile away from any voices but their own and the singing birds.
once beautiful and verdant with waving trees; singing birds enchant
When our old students return to Tuskegee now, as they often do, and go into our large, beautiful, well-ventilated, and well-lighted dining room, and see tempting, well-cooked food--largely grown by the students themselves--and see tables, neat tablecloths and napkins, and vases of flowers upon the tables, and hear singing birds, and note that each meal is served exactly upon the minute, with no disorder, and with almost no complaint coming from the hundreds that now fill our dining room, they, too, often say to me that they are glad that we started as we did, and built ourselves up year by year, by a slow and natural process of growth.
Or again, it would be an aviary, fitted with all kinds of singing birds, or a treasury heaped up with precious stones; but whatever I might see, all was perfect of its own sort.