come up

(redirected from rise in the world)

come up

1. To physically travel from a lower point or level to a higher one. When you get here, just come up to my apartment—it's on the fourth floor. Come up here and look at this leak in the bathroom.
2. To rise in the sky, as of the sun. These days, I'm always awake before the sun comes up, thanks to my infant daughter.
3. To become a topic of discussion. Unfortunately, the idea of a raise never came up in our meeting.
4. To happen or occur unexpectedly. Setbacks keep coming up in our investigation.
5. To come near or approach. He came up to me in the club and asked if I would like to dance.
6. To compare with or equal something in value, size, standards, etc. The new courthouse doesn't come up to the grand elegance of the old building, but it will be much more functionally efficient. My electric car doesn't come up to sports cars in terms of speed, but I'd rather have one that doesn't require gasoline.
7. To be increasingly successful, especially by advancing one's social status or financial situation. This definition is often used in the phrase "come up in the world." You will always reap the rewards of hard work, but you can truly come up by making connections and knowing the right people. After college, Lauren came up quickly in the world of medicine.
8. To increase in value. Luckily, housing prices in our neighborhood have come up since we bought our house.
See also: come, up

come up

 
1. Lit. to come from a lower place to a higher one. You can come up now. They are gone. Come up and enjoy the view from the tallest rooftop in the county.
2. Lit. to come near; to approach. He came up and began to talk to us. A heron came up while we were fishing, but it just ignored us.
3. Fig. to come to someone's attention. The question of what time to be there never came up. The matter came up, but it was never dealt with.
See also: come, up

come up

1. Arise, present itself, as in This question never came up. [Mid-1800s]
2. Rise (from a lower place to a higher one) as in We'll leave as soon as the sun comes up. [9th century]
3. Also, come up to. Approach, come near, as in He came up and said hello, or The dog came right up to Nora. [Early 1700s]
4. Also, come up to. Rise in status or value, be equal to, as in His paintings will never come up to his teacher's, or This officer came up through the ranks. [c. 1600] A variant is come up or rise in the world , used for someone who has risen in rank, wealth, or status; for example, He has really come up in the world-he now owns a yacht, or I could see at once that she was a woman who would rise in the world. Also see the subsequent idioms beginning with come up.
See also: come, up

come up

v.
1. To rise or ascend: When the girl prodded the bottom of the pond with the stick, bubbles came up. I called into the basement and the children came up.
2. To appear above the horizon. Used of the sun, moon, and stars: The sun came up.
3. To become higher in value: Their grades came up once they started studying more.
4. To rise in status or rank: This general came up from the lower ranks very quickly.
5. To travel to a town or city, especially for a visit: Why don't you come up to New York for the weekend?
6. To travel to and arrive at a northern place: We came up to Canada to look for wolves.
7. To draw near to something or someone; approach something or someone: They came up and said hello to us.
8. To occur or arise, especially unexpectedly. Used of situations, issues, and problems: The principal couldn't go to the meeting because something important had come up at home. We never considered whether the kids should go with us; the question never came up.
See also: come, up
References in classic literature ?
Sterling by this time had two additional pupils; for though this gentleman's rise in the world was not of that meteor-like rapidity which the admirers of his extemporaneous eloquence had expected for a preacher whose voice demanded so wide a sphere, he had yet enough of growing prosperity to enable him to increase his expenditure in continued disproportion to his income.
The first night they took up their inn at Nottingham Town, yet they did not go to pay their duty to the Sheriff, for his worship bore many a bitter grudge against Robin Hood, which grudges had not been lessened by Robin's rise in the world.
If they are anxious to see you happily married, here is a man whose amiable character gives every assurance of it;if they wish to have you settled in the same country and circle which they have chosen to place you in, here it will be accomplished; and if their only object is that you should, in the common phrase, be well married, here is the comfortable fortune, the respectable establishment, the rise in the world which must satisfy them.
He had grown into an extremely clear-headed, cautious, prudent young man, who was safe to rise in the world.
why shouldn't she have a rise in the world like other people?
She saw him as he approached and gave him a nod and smile which seemed meant as an assurance that she was still a good-natured girl, in spite of her enviable rise in the world.