rip-off

(redirected from ripoffs)

rip off

1. verb Literally, to tear or pull something off of someone or something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "rip" and " off." The throng of screaming fans nearly ripped the singer's shirt off. Luckily, I remembered to rip off the price tag before handing Sara her gift.
2. verb To steal (something). A noun or pronoun can be used between "rip" and "off." The kids were caught going to different shops around the city and ripping off snacks. If you're ripping cars off, you're going to get caught!
3. verb To plagiarize or shamelessly copy something or someone. A noun or pronoun can be used between "rip" and "off." I can't believe he ripped my idea off like that! Hey, that was my idea! Don't rip me off like that!
4. verb To steal from or defraud someone; to cheat or swindle someone. A noun or pronoun can be used between "rip" and "off." The guy said it was a great deal for such a rare album, but I'm starting to think he ripped me off. The CEO was convicted for ripping off nearly a quarter of a million customers over the course of a decade.
5. noun An instance of theft or fraud; a cheat or swindle. The phrase is often used to indicate that the product promised or advertised was not what was delivered. In this usage, the phrase is usually hyphenated or spelled as a single word. They sign you up for recurring payments but never actually send the magazines. It's just a big rip-off. This didn't even come with batteries? What a rip-off!
6. noun An instance of blatant or shameless plagiarism. In this usage, the phrase is usually hyphenated. It's a cool-looking movie, but the plot is a total rip-off of "Alien." This didn't even come with batteries? What a rip-off!
See also: off, rip

rip-off

A bad deal; a fraudulent business or transaction. I can't believe I spent so much on this blender, and it's already broken. What a rip-off! I heard on the news that the charity is a rip-off, so don't send them any money.
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

rip-off

1. n. a theft; a deception; an exploitation. (see also rip.) What a rip-off! I want my money back.
2. mod. having to do with theft and deception. I consider myself to be rip-off champion of North America.
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
The sports and auto industries made a major course correction during the 1990s and early 2000s; video game designers were making digital ripoffs for years.
Mark McKee was doing all the graphics at World then, and this was when they were all ripoffs. I told McKee I wanted a Gremlin because all my friends in Long Beach called me a Gremlin.
His mentioning that Black Hills quotation of only a 5 percent increase in price by the ammo manufacturers certainly points the finger at the ripoffs being the wholesalers and retailers.
It's also important to note that ripoffs in games are nothing new.
And although this may be the last in the current series, we wouldn''t bet against her coming back for another series to expose more ripoffs.
This is done in an effort to crack down on the relatively numerous cases of ripoffs of foreigners by drivers belonging to marginal taxi firms.
And Norwich Union warned the plague of road-crash ripoffs was likely to add pounds 60 to the premiums of policy-holders.
But complaints about ripoffs such as unsolicited texts which cost users to receive have soared by 40 per cent compared to last year.
HIGH charges for wine and special occasion meals are among the biggest restaurant ripoffs, a new report says.
SCAM-PROOF YOUR LIFE: 377 SMART WAYS TO PROTECT YOU & YOUR FAMILY FROM RIPOFFS, BOGUS DEALS AND OTHER CONSUMER HEADACHES isn't your usual compendium of tips, but comes from a 'scam alert' expert who has gathered information from all kinds of industry insiders, from doctors to home repair experts and bankers.
And the weight of so many bad "Friends" ripoffs nearly killed the entire sitcom genre.
It's a mind-boggling coagulation of wrong numbers and ripoffs. Four out of 10 of callers are being given incorrect numbers by service providers.
Unfortunately, one federal-state sweep is unlikely to stop such ripoffs. "During an economic downturn, people are vulnerable to these schemes," says Mora.
``The people behind these ripoffs think this is a good way for them to make money and that it is a low risk venture - but they face prison and a hefty fine if they are caught.''
What motivated Bersia to research these ripoffs ad infinitum and to keep pounding away from every angle?