ripe

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be ripe for the picking

To be in an ideal position or at the perfect stage to be utilized, benefited or profited from, taken advantage of, exploited, etc. (Alludes to fruit being at the right stage to be harvested.) Assert our brand early and aggressively enough, and this new market will be ripe for the picking. I heard that massive company just dropped their current PR team—that contract is ripe for the picking! This land is ripe for the picking if we can get the locals to sign over the rights to it.
See also: picking, ripe

early ripe, early rotten

A child prodigy will likely lose their abilities as they age. A: "But you played the piano so beautifully when you were younger." B: "I know. I guess it's true what they say—early ripe, early rotten."
See also: early, rotten

live to a ripe old age

To live to an especially old age. You won't be living to a ripe old age if you keep eating all that junk food! My grandmother on my dad's side lived to the ripe old age of 108.
See also: age, live, old, ripe

ripe for (something)

In the condition that most invites or calls for something to happen, or particularly ready or in need of something. In the absence of the dictator's authoritarian regime, the country is ripe for the rise of extremist groups. The industry claims that it has instituted safety standards, but in reality it is ripe for reform.
See also: ripe

the time is ripe

Now is the best moment or most favorable time to do something. With prices so low, the time is ripe to buy up real estate in the city. Public sentiment is on our side. The time is ripe for revolution!
See also: ripe, time

at a/the ripe old age

At an especially old age. Even at the ripe old age of 90, my grandmother still loves to go shopping.
See also: age, old, ripe

to a/the ripe old age

To an especially old age. You won't live to a ripe old age if you keep eating all that junk food! My grandmother on my dad's side lived to the ripe old age of 108.
See also: age, old, ripe

like a ripe plum

Easily; with very little resistance. After a few months of being cut off from supplies, the city will fall into our hands like a ripe plum.
See also: like, plum, ripe

ripe old age

A very old age. Even at the ripe old age of 90, my grandmother still loves to go shopping. All I want at the end of my life is to die at a ripe old age surrounded by my family.
See also: age, old, ripe

Early ripe, early rotten,

 and Soon ripe, soon rotten.
Prov. A child with extraordinary talent or intelligence will probably lose those qualities by the time he or she grows up. Jill: Philip was such a fine young boy; I'm surprised he's become such a good-for-nothing adult. Jane: Early ripe, early rotten. Jane: You must be very proud of your little boy. He seems so mature for his age. Ellen: I'm afraid it won't last. You know what they say: "Soon ripe, soon rotten."
See also: early, rotten

ripe old age

a very old age. Mr. Smith died last night, but he lived to a ripe old age—99. All the Smiths seem to reach a ripe old age.
See also: age, old, ripe

time is ripe

Prov. It is the most favorable time to do something. You ought to buy a house this year. Prices are so low, and you have enough money saved for a down payment. The time is ripe. Since Joe was in a good mood, I judged that the time was ripe to ask him for the favor I needed.
See also: ripe, time

when the time is ripe

Fig. at exactly the right time. I'll tell her the good news when the time is ripe. When the time is ripe, I'll bring up the subject again.
See also: ripe, time

ripe old age

An age advanced in years, as in I expect to live to a ripe old age. The adjective ripe here means "fully developed physically and mentally," but the current use of the idiom usually just signifies a long lifespan. [Second half of 1300s]
See also: age, old, ripe

time is ripe

This is the right moment for something, as in The time is ripe for a revival of that play. Shakespeare used this term (and may have originated it) in 1 Henry IV (1:3): "Letters shall direct your course when time is ripe."
See also: ripe, time

like a ripe plum (or ripe plums)

used to convey that something can be obtained with little or no effort.
See also: like, plum, ripe

at/to a ˈripe old age

,

at/to the ripe old age of...

at/to a very old age: My grandmother lived to a ripe old age.My uncle was still driving a car at the ripe old age of 89.
See also: age, old, ripe

the time is ˈripe (for somebody) (to do something)

,

the time is ˈripe for something/for doing something

(literary) it is the right time to do something: I think the time’s ripe for him to leave home if he wants to.The time is ripe for a change in this country.
See also: ripe, time

ripe

1. mod. alcohol intoxicated. Yes, they were ripe all right. Stinking drunk.
2. mod. foul; smelly. Whooey! This place is ripe. What died?
3. mod. crude; raunchy. Your jokes are a bit ripe.

ripe old age

Advanced in years, quite old. This expression is itself of a ripe old age—it dates from the second half of the fourteenth century—and is generally used in a positive, admiring sense.W. Somerset Maugham used it in Creatures of Circumstance (1947): “. . . little house in the country where he could potter about till death claimed him at a ripe old age.”
See also: age, old, ripe

time is ripe, the

This is a suitable occasion or moment for a particular event. Time here is likened to fruit that has ripened and is ready to pick or eat. The term was already known in Shakespeare’s time. He used it in Henry IV, Part 1: “I by letters shall direct your course. When time is ripe, which will be suddenly, I’ll steal to Glendower and Lord Mortimer” (1.3).
See also: time
References in periodicals archive ?
This attractive, ripely fruity wine blends four parts merlot with one part grenache noir.
Chteau Tour de Mirambeau Rserve 2005 (pounds 6.99 at Oddbins) is much less pungent than a Loire or New Zealand alternative; it's rounder, softer and more ripely fruity.
Kendal looks terrific, cutting perhaps the most beautiful tragic heroine the West End has seen since Jessica Lange's Mary Tyrone, which is important since Beckett, like O'Neill, writes ripely sexual women.
Finally, a Spanish white, Cueva Solana Torrontes and Treixadura 1995, pounds 3.99, from Oddbins, a delicious blend of two full-flavoured Spanish grape types using Aussie wine-making methods, is fresh but ripely fruity, with a hint of lemon and a honeyed finish.
It's ripely fruity with lemon and peachy flavours, easy drinking, most attractive, nothing at all like the Laurent Perrier Vintage, but a serious competitor for the more basic cheap and cheerful champagnes.
On the surface ripely satirical, but at heart sympathetic, Loomer's play is particularly notable for its sensitive attention to a sector of the American workforce that is rarely examined in cultural contexts: the thousands of emigrant women from Latin America who make a living by taking care of other women's children.
And for a good barbecue red, Oddbins has the soft, ripely plummy Galet Vineyards 1995 Merlot Vin De Pays d'Oc (pounds 3.99) from the south of France.
Antony Sher has always been a ripely theatrical actor, so it makes sense that he should now have written a ripely theatrical play.
She'd give anything to go back 28 years and possess the taut skin and slim figure she poured into the hot pants of the ripely virginal Liver Bird, Sandra Hutchinson.
Lamenting near play's end "the ceaseless din of trying to be amused," young Nicky strikes at the very quick of the existence that has been so vibrantly lived by his enthusiastically, ripely self-dramatizing mother, Annis' Florence.
Her performance was at once ripely exuberant and deeply haunting, whereas her Blanche, despite (or perhaps in part because of) the careful, even fussy attention to detail in it, settles too often simply for camp.
The British actress's thin voice, dull, contemporary intonations and remarkably inexpressive features make her a wooden centerpiece for this ripely silly affair, which fails to come even close to the chilling atmosphere of Jack Clayton's 1961 Deborah Kerr starrer "The Innocents," based on the same novel.
The laughter that rolled freely through the ripely comic first act, thanks to Dotrice's antic, sensationally funny turn as the wily Phil, is all but forgotten.