ring the changes

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ring the changes

To continually alter or change something. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. I'm not surprised that Tina showed up with purple hair today—she loves ringing the changes with her hair color.
See also: change, ring
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

ring the changes

Keep varying how one performs an action or says something, as in She went on and on, ringing the changes on the joy of computers. This expression alludes to the art of change-ringing, where a series of church bells are rung in as many sequences, or changes, as possible. [Early 1600s]
See also: change, ring
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ring the changes

BRITISH
COMMON If you ring the changes, you make changes to the way something is organized or done in order to make it different or to improve it. I like to ring the changes with dark curtains in the winter, and light Indian ones in the summer. Choose a classic trouser suit that you can wear all year round, and ring the changes each season with blouses, scarves and jewellery. Note: In bell-ringing, to `ring the changes' means to ring a number of church bells, each of which gives a different note, one after the other in every possible combination.
See also: change, ring
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

ring the changes

vary the ways of expressing, arranging, or doing something.
In bell-ringing, the changes are the different sequences in which a peal of bells may be rung.
See also: change, ring
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

ring the ˈchanges (on something)

(British English) make changes to something in order to have greater variety: I’m pleased to see that they’re ringing the changes in the staff canteen. The new menus are much more interesting.This expression refers to bell-ringing, where the bells can be rung in different orders.
See also: change, ring
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

ring the changes, to

To try every possible variation in doing or saying something. The term refers to the ancient English art of change-ringing, in which a series of tuned church bells are rung in as many different sequences as possible. Depending on the number of bells, a great many changes are possible—for example, 720 with six bells. The term was transferred to other kinds of variation by the early seventeenth century, as in T. Adams’s Devil’s Banquet (1614): “Some ring the changes of opinions.” In the late eighteenth century the term also was used for a swindle in which something inferior was substituted for an article of quality; this usage is obsolete.
See also: ring
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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