right to life

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right to life

1. noun The belief that every human being has the right to live. The phrase is often used in discussions of war, abortion, and capital punishment, among other topics. I believe in the right to life, and I'm not going to debate that with you, since you clearly support legalized abortion. How can we claim to believe in the right to life and also support the war effort?
2. adjective Holding such beliefs. Often hyphenated. Yes, I am a member of a right-to-life group, as that cause is very important to me. The right-to-life issues are always the ones that trip up politicians.
See also: life, right
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
"The right-to-life movement has lost a champion and a pioneer.
Young people are volunteering their time at local pregnancy centers and taking on key roles within local right-to-life chapters.
At a right-to-life seminar in 1979, for example, Koop had referred to the "women's lib movement" and the "gay pride movement" as propelling "anti-family trends," comments women's and gay rights group pointed to as evidence Koop would discriminate against them and decimate abortion-related medical programs.
To the right-to-life movement, Koop was a heroand a chip they wanted cahsed in when Ronald Reagan took office in 1981.
He had sat on the boards of three national right-to-life groups and was one of the movement's major theorists.
In a report published on the institute's website, director Austin Ruse said concerns about the United Nations' International Criminal Court overriding national sovereignty are not unfounded, especially when it comes to right-to-life issues.
"We didn't enjoy total success at the conferences, but I found it exciting to bring the right-to-life viewpoint to international delegates," Graves told The National Catholic Register.
And it remains among the right-to-life movement's top congressional priorities for the 115th Congress.
As you've read in the pages of National Right to Life NEWS, the first week in October was a momentous one for the right-to-life movement.
Patricia Schroeder and Olympia Snowe proposed the creation of three new contraception research centers, the project was awarded a paltry $3 million after right-to-life opposed it, charging that the research would involve RU486.
And Stevens, who has received his share of anti-abortion hate mail, has no love for right-to-life. But it's not just groups like ALL he's annoyed with.
Another pair of right-wing Catholics, Paul and Judie Brown, were the ones who actually orgarized fundamentalist Protestants into their own version of the right-to-life movement.
No one on the right-to-life side thinks of a pregnant woman as a mechanical incubator; no one regards her as invisible and irrelevant.
Right-to-life advocates have never been known for being selective; they claim that all unborn human beings are worthy of life, whether they are white, black, brown, or yellow.