right to life

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right to life

1. noun The belief that every human being has the right to live. The phrase is often used in discussions of war, abortion, and capital punishment, among other topics. I believe in the right to life, and I'm not going to debate that with you, since you clearly support legalized abortion. How can we claim to believe in the right to life and also support the war effort?
2. adjective (often hyphenated) Holding such beliefs. Yes, I am a member of a right-to-life group, as that cause is very important to me. The right-to-life issues are always the ones that trip up politicians.
See also: life, right
References in periodicals archive ?
And Stevens, who has received his share of anti-abortion hate mail, has no love for right-to-life.
Patricia Schroeder and Olympia Snowe proposed the creation of three new contraception research centers, the project was awarded a paltry $3 million after right-to-life opposed it, charging that the research would involve RU486.
At a right-to-life seminar in 1979, for example, Koop had referred to the "women's lib movement" and the "gay pride movement" as propelling "anti-family trends," comments women's and gay rights group pointed to as evidence Koop would discriminate against them and decimate abortion-related medical programs.
Then, in 1982, there was the troubling BabyDoe case, which hinted that Koop's right-to-life dogmatism would guide his thinking as surgeon general.
Even now as I work full-time in the right-to-life movement and blog for LifeNews, I continue to draw upon the lessons learned at the Academy.
Jefferson devoted her talents and her life to the right-to-life movement for much of the past four decades.
The right-to-life cause is not the concern of only a special few but it should be the cause of all those who care about fairness and justice, love and compassion and liberty with law .
Mildred Jefferson used every forum available to educate America and encourage people of all ages to become active in the right-to-life movement," St.
They have no shortage of creative ideas about how to educate our communities on right-to-life issues.
To take the last point first, the lessons from the past when supposedly "principled" (but actually foolish) behavior at election time seriously harmed the right-to-life cause were reviewed in my April 2007 column ("When Common Sense is Lacking").
Going this route virtually guarantees that the right-to-life cause loses out in the general election.
Yet, his appointments to the Supreme Court and the federal judiciary over eight years have done much more serious damage to the right-to-life cause.
In practical terms, the elite has misunderstood the difference between the varying political power of the pro-life movement and the invariant truth of the right-to-life principle.
For the right-to-life movement, the obvious lesson is that we must recruit as many pro-lifers as possible for participation in public life.
It not only reaffirms the inherent right-to-life of every human being consistent with previous human rights treaties, but also adds that nations signing and ratifying the treaty (States Parties) "shall take all necessary measures to ensure that right for persons with disability on an equal basis with others.