(right) under (one's) (very) nose

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(right) under (one's) (very) nose

1. In a place easy to see or find. I've been looking all over for that invitation, and it was right under my nose the whole time!
2. When one is physically present. I can't believe that one of my employees was falsifying records right under my nose.
See also: nose
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

(right) under someone's (very) nose

 
1. Fig. right in front of someone. I thought I'd lost my purse, but it was sitting on the table under my very nose. How did Mary fail to see the book? It was right under her nose.
2. Fig. in someone's presence. The thief stole Jim's wallet right under his nose. The jewels were stolen from under the very noses of the security guards.
See also: nose
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

under one's nose

Right there, in plain view, as in Your keys are on the table, right under your nose. This expression is generally a reminder that something one cannot find is actually there. [c. 1600]
See also: nose
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

under your nose

COMMON If something, especially a bad thing, happens under your nose, it happens in your presence or very near to you, and you either do not notice it or cannot do anything to stop it. I became convinced that something sinister was taking place right under my nose. Then suddenly I knew what had been going on here all along, right under our noses. Note: You can also say that someone takes something from under your nose, meaning that they steal it in your presence or very near to you, and you either do not notice it or cannot do anything to stop it. The prisoners stole it from under the noses of two red-faced police officers.
See also: nose
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

under someone's nose

(of an action) committed openly and boldly, but without someone noticing or noticing in time to prevent it. informal
See also: nose
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

(right) under somebody’s ˈnose

(informal)
1 very close to somebody, even though they cannot see it: ‘Where are the car keys?’ ‘There, right under your nose.’
2 used to talk about something bad that happens over a period of time, but which nobody has noticed: Stealing from the kitchen has been going on right under their noses for years.
See also: nose
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

under (someone's) nose

In plain view: The keys are right under your nose.
See also: nose
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

under one's nose, (right)

In plain sight. This expression, nearly always used as a reminder that something one cannot find or see is actually right there, dates from 1600 or even earlier. John Norden used it in The Surveyor’s Dialogue (1607): “You are but a meane observer of the course of things passing dayly under your nose.”
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
The First Minister was yesterday accused of being "unable to smell what's right under her nose" as the GMB union disclosed footage to the Record which showed the piles of rotting rubbish and seeping sewage staff encounter in her Glasgow Southside constituency.
No2 her "Earlier this week, the Scottish Government hailed the quality of life in Scotland but they would do well to visit areas like Glasgow Southside where it would seem the First Minister can't smell what's right under her nose."
And, ticking off another rom-com clich, it's little surprise that the man of her dreams is right under her nose all along.
Financial security seems to have been so important throughout her life that she was able to ignore even the most obvious of her husband's many liaisons, including the one that took place in the White House right under her nose with her own press secretary, Pamela Tumure.
And, ticking off another romcom cliche, it's little surprise that the man of her dreams is right under her nose.
This little fella must have some hunger on him - as well as some nerve - to devour a leopard's lunch right under her nose.