ride roughshod over (someone or something)

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ride roughshod over (someone or something)

To treat someone or something with marked disdain, brutality, or contempt; to act without regard for the wellbeing of something or someone. In her ascent to the top of the political ladder, the senator rode roughshod over anyone who stood in her way. The new management team has ridden roughshod over the projects that we've been planning for months.
See also: over, ride, roughshod
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

ride roughshod over someone or something

 and run roughshod over someone or something
Fig. to treat someone or something with disdain or scorn. Tom seems to ride roughshod over his friends. You shouldn't have come into our town to ride roughshod over our laws and our traditions.
See also: over, ride, roughshod
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ride roughshod over

Act without regard for the feelings or interests of others, as in She just forges on, riding roughshod over her colleagues. This term alludes to the practice of arming horses with horseshoes mounted with projecting nails or points, which both gave them better traction and served as a weapon against fallen enemy soldiers. By 1800 it was being used figuratively for bullying behavior.
See also: over, ride, roughshod
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ride roughshod over someone/something

COMMON If someone rides roughshod over someone or something, they take decisions that will benefit themselves without considering what anyone else believes or wants. Bosses nowadays seem to think they can ride roughshod over unions. This is one of the few occasions in local government where voters can stop politicians riding roughshod over their wishes. Note: The verb run can be used instead of ride. Beaverbrook had run roughshod over the British military establishment to accomplish his objectives. Note: In the past, a roughshod horse had nail heads sticking out from its shoes, so it would not slip on icy roads. These shoes could cause terrible injuries if the horse rode over a person in a battle or by accident.
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

ride roughshod over

carry out your own plans or wishes with arrogant disregard for others.
1977 Times Literary Supplement Sociologists are notorious for their use of generalizing terms that ride roughshod over the particularities of history.
See also: over, ride, roughshod
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

ride ˈroughshod over somebody/something

(especially British English) (American English usually run ˈroughshod over somebody/something) treat somebody/somebody’s feelings, ideas, protests, etc. with no respect at all because you do not consider them important: The local authority rode roughshod over the protests of parents and closed down the school.
Roughshod is an old word to describe a horse that was wearing shoes with nails that stick out.
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

ride roughshod over

To treat with brutal force: a manager who rode roughshod over all opposition.
See also: over, ride, roughshod
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Corporate toad Ted Hendricks (Adam Scott) is hired to oversee the "transition" and he rides roughshod over disgruntled staff.
It rides roughshod over its context with an 'anywhere' "To date we've received comments in response to our one-to-one meetings and our public exhibition.
The Deputy Prime Minister cannot expect to be taken seriously when claiming the Lib Dems are democratic as he rides roughshod over the party.
When the European Court of Human Rights rides roughshod over British justice, something is fundamentally wrong with our relationship with Europe.
Gulliver's Travels rides roughshod over the subtle themes of Jonathan Swift's classic novel.
Unite members will not stand by as their employer rides roughshod over their retirement security.
She says Cllr Mutton "speaks to smaller parties to persuade them", he actually rides roughshod over anything he doesn't agree with, highlighted by his behaviour to ignore the no-smoking policy around the Council House.
A sound track that is painfully over-wrought rides roughshod over our nerves, as does the banal psychological and religious content, at best, adolescent.
It will have you wincing and rides roughshod overother70s horror films..
No, I'm not talking about Gordon Brown, who he rides roughshod over every week, during Prime Minister's Question Time.
The justice system "rides roughshod" over victims while people are too frightened or reluctant to help officers, it added.
Except we have a council that is not listening to the people of Cardiff, and rides roughshod over them.
It would be folly to marry a man who constantly rides roughshod over your feelings and makes you miserable.
More and more people are setting up such websites to name and shame crooked solicitors, corrupt councils, rogue insurance companies and just about any organisation or individual who rides roughshod over a person's rights, or who have been hard done by.