ridden


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ride (one's) luck

To find success through fortune or chance rather than through one's own agency or risk-taking. (Used especially in reference to sporting events.) Primarily heard in UK. Cheltenham has been riding their luck lately, winning their last two games on penalty kicks alone, but they'll need to step up their game if they hope to have a place in the championship.
See also: luck, ride

ride (someone's) ass

1. To frequently or constantly harass, nag, or upbraid someone to do, accomplish, or complete something. The boss is riding everyone's ass to get the project finished by next week. Quit riding my ass, I'll get it done eventually!
2. To tailgate, i.e. to follow unnecessarily closely behind another vehicle while driving. I wish that trucker wouldn't ride my ass down this hill.
See also: ass, ride

ride (someone's) back

To frequently or constantly harass, nag, or upbraid someone to do, accomplish, or complete something. The boss is riding everyone's back to get the project finished by next week. Quit riding my back, I'll get it done eventually!
See also: back, ride

ride (someone's) butt

To frequently or constantly harass, nag, or upbraid someone to do, accomplish, or complete something. The boss is riding everyone's butt to get the project finished by next week. Quit riding my butt, I'll get it done eventually!
See also: butt, ride

ride tall in the/(one's) saddle

To be or remain proud, stoical, or august in one's manner or composure. Even after two years of a losing war, the general still rode tall in his saddle before his troops. I'll have nothing to do with your schemes or plot. One day, you're going to be locked up and lose everything, and I'll be riding tall in the saddle when you do.
See also: ride, saddle, tall

ride (on) the wave (of something)

To enjoy the advantage or benefit of a particularly successful, popular, fortunate, interesting, etc., moment or period of time. Jonathan has been riding the wave of his sister's celebrity ever since she was cast in that blockbuster film series. The popular Internet artist has ridden the wave of support from her fan base to launch an incredibly successful crowd funding campaign for a new project. Ever since I won the lottery, everybody has been really friendly to me, and I've just been riding the wave ever since!
See also: ride, wave

ride with the punches

1. Literally, in martial arts (especially boxing), to maneuver one's body away from a blow so as to lessen the force of its impact. He's not the most aggressive fighter—instead, he relies on his endurance and skill, riding with the punches to wear down his opponent until the best moment to strike.
2. By extension, to adapt to setbacks, difficulties, or adversity so as to better manage or cope with their impact on one's life. (Note: This phrase is a less common variant of the phrase "roll with the punches," which carries the same literal and figurative meanings.) Losing my job was really tough, but I've just been trying to ride with the punches until I get back on my feet. I learned that my grandfather passed away right before my final exams in college, but I just rode with the punches and did the best that I could.
See also: punch, ride

ride (on) a wave of (something)

To enjoy the advantage of or continue to benefit from a situation that is successful, fortunate, trendy, etc. Jonathan has been riding a wave of celebrity ever since he was cast in the leading role for the new blockbuster. The popular Internet artist has ridden a wave of support from her fanbase to launch an incredibly successful crowdfunding campaign for a new project.
See also: of, ride, wave

ride roughshod over (someone or something)

To treat someone or something with marked disdain, brutality, or contempt; to act without regard for the wellbeing of something or someone. In her ascent to the top of the political ladder, the senator rode roughshod over anyone who stood in her way. The new management team has ridden roughshod over the projects that we've been planning for months.
See also: over, ride, roughshod

ride the gravy train

To be in a state, position, or job where one makes an excessive amount of money without expending much or any effort. I'll be riding the gravy train once I get paid from the settlement of the lawsuit! My brother has been riding the gravy train ever since he married his wife, whose family owns one of the largest oil companies in the world.
See also: gravy, ride, train

ride a tiger

To become or find oneself responsible for something risky, precarious, or unsafe to abandon; to do something that is safer to continue than it is to quit. It has now become obvious that our country has been riding a tiger with our military intervention in this region—it was foolish to get involved, but it would be catastrophic to leave now.
See also: ride, tiger

ride for a fall

To act in such a reckless, careless, or ignorant way as to likely create danger, conflict, or disaster. I think the prime minister is riding for a fall with her increasingly antagonistic rhetoric against working-class voters. He's earning tons of money now, but he's riding for a fall with the shady investments he's been making lately.
See also: fall, ride

ride shotgun

To ride in the front passenger seat of a car. An allusion to stage coaches in 19th-century America, which were often protected from outlaws by someone who sat wielding a shotgun next to the driver. Mom, Jake got to ride shotgun this morning—it's my turn! OK, let's get back on the road. Who wants to ride shotgun?
See also: ride, shotgun

ride the gravy train

Fig. to live in ease or luxury. 1/7 had a million dollars, I sure could ride the gravy train. I wouldn't like loafing if I were rich. I don't want to ride the gravy train.
See also: gravy, ride, train

ride for a fall

Court danger or disaster, as in I think that anyone who backs the incumbent is riding for a fall. This idiom alludes to the reckless rider who risks a bad spill. [Late 1800s]
See also: fall, ride

ride shotgun

Guard someone or something while in transit, as in The reporter found himself in the odd position of riding shotgun for an accused mobster. This term alludes to the armed defender of a stagecoach who sat beside the driver to protect against marauders and bandits. Later it was transferred to anyone riding in the front passenger seat of a motor vehicle, as well as to the more general function of protection. [Mid-1900s]
See also: ride, shotgun

ride shotgun

If someone rides shotgun, they sit in the front of a vehicle, next to the driver. I was riding shotgun on a night patrol when a boy darted out from an alley and ran towards the truck. Note: This expression comes from times in the past when a man with a shotgun sat next to the driver of a coach and horses for protection.
See also: ride, shotgun

ride for a fall

act in a reckless or arrogant way that invites defeat or failure. informal
This phrase originated as a late 19th-century horse-riding expression, meaning to ride a horse, especially in the hunting field, in such a way as to make an accident likely.
See also: fall, ride

ride shotgun

1 travel as a guard in the seat next to the driver of a vehicle. 2 ride in the passenger seat of a vehicle. 3 act as a protector. chiefly North American
See also: ride, shotgun

ride a tiger

take on a responsibility or embark on a course of action which subsequently cannot safely be abandoned.
The expression comes from the Chinese proverb ‘He who rides a tiger is afraid to dismount’.
1940 Daily Progress (USA) I believe that Hitler is riding a tiger in trying to keep all Europe under control by sheer force.
See also: ride, tiger

ride ˈshotgun

(American English, informal) ride in the front passenger seat of a car or truck: My turn to ride shotgun today!Originally, this referred to an armed guard who travelled in the seat next to the driver.
See also: ride, shotgun

ride shotgun

1. tv. to accompany and guard someone or something. (see also shotgun.) I have to take the beer over to the party. Why don’t you come along and ride shotgun?
2. tv. to ride in the passenger seat of a car, next to the driver. I want to ride shotgun so I don’t have to sit back there with those guys.
See also: ride, shotgun

ride for a fall

To court danger or disaster.
See also: fall, ride

ride shotgun

1. To guard a person or thing while in transit.
2. Slang To ride in the front passenger seat of a car or truck.
See also: ride, shotgun

ride shotgun

To sit in the front passenger seat of a vehicle during a trip.
See also: ride, shotgun

ride a tiger

To find yourself in a precarious situation. The phrase comes from “He who rides a tiger is afraid to dismount.” Which is to say, once you find yourself in a dangerous circumstance, getting out of it can be even more potentially hazardous, whether to your health or your career.
See also: ride, tiger
References in periodicals archive ?
But only once in the past quarter-century has the previous year's top money-winner ridden the Derby favorite, and only twice in that stretch has the previous year's Derby winner ridden the Derby favorite.
The bike-patrol police escort was actually for former Los Angeles mayor Richard Riordan, who has ridden all of the eight premarathon bike events.
No one's told us the ride is unsafe,'' Gallardo said, noting that millions have ridden Goliath since it debuted last year.
Millions of people have ridden Goliath and nothing like this has ever happened before.
He hadn't ridden in the Derby since long shots Tossofthecoin and Valiant Nature finished last and next to last in 1993 and 1994.
Club member Dominguez says if it wasn't for a hurting back, his wife, Lorraine, would have ridden with him on the beginners' ride.
For hard-core coaster enthusiasts - many of whom have ridden hundreds of coasters all over the world - the prospect of riding a completely different kind of roller coaster sends them searching for superlatives.
Queen of Oz, ridden by Abdiel Toribio, ran a mile and a sixteenth in 1:47 2/5 and paid $5.