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get-rich-quick

(used as a modifier before a noun) Of or characterized by generating a large sum of money quickly and (typically) without requiring much effort or energy. Jenny's always coming up with some get-rich-quick scheme to lift us out of this dinky little town. Always be wary of anyone who tries to sell you some get-rich-quick idea—usually the only person getting rich is the salesman.

rich seam

A multifaceted topic that provides a lot of interesting material for discussion or writing. Judy's childhood experiences were a rich seam for her as she wrote her first novel.
See also: rich, seam

be (all) part of life's rich pageant

A phrase that encourages acceptance of the unenjoyable things that happen in life. Nobody likes dealing with car problems, but they're just part of life's rich pageant, unfortunately. The tantrums of toddlerhood are all part of life's rich pageant.
See also: of, part, rich

be (all) part of life's rich tapestry

A phrase that encourages acceptance of the unenjoyable things that happen in life. Nobody likes dealing with car problems, but they're just part of life's rich tapestry, unfortunately. The tantrums of toddlerhood are all part of life's rich tapestry.
See also: of, part, rich

That's rich!

That's not a fair criticism or statement, considering who is saying it. You think I'm flaky? That's rich, considering you didn't show up either.

filthy lucre

money. I sure could use a little of that filthy lucre. I don't want to touch any of your filthy lucre.
See also: filthy

filthy rich

 
1. Fig. very wealthy. I wouldn't mind being filthy rich. There are too many filthy rich people now.
2. Fig. people who are very wealthy. The filthy rich can afford that kind of thing, but I can't. I sort of feel sorry for the filthy rich.
See also: filthy, rich

It is better to be born lucky than rich.

Prov. If you are born rich, you may lose your money, but if you are born lucky, you will always get what you need or want just by chance. Maybe your family doesn't have a lot of money, but you are lucky, you know. And it's better to be born lucky than rich.
See also: better, born, lucky, rich

one law for the rich and another for the poor

Prov. Rich people are sometimes able to escape without punishment when they commit crimes, while poor people are usually punished. It doesn't seem fair—rich people can avoid paying their taxes and not get in trouble, but poor people are always punished if they don't pay. We shouldn't have one law for the rich and another for the poor.
See also: and, another, law, one, poor, rich

rich in something

having valuable resources, characteristics, traditions, or history. The entire region is rich in historical churches. Our soil is rich in important nutrients.
See also: rich

rich man's joke is always funny

Prov. Everyone wants to curry favor with rich people and so will always laugh at their jokes. (From a poem by Thomas Edward Brown.) We all thought that Mr. Lisle was a narrow-minded, unpleasant old man, but we were careful to act otherwise, because he was wealthy. A rich man's joke is always funny.
See also: always, funny, joke, rich

rich with something

having a lot of something; abundant in something. The beautiful book was rich with color illustrations. The old town was rich with elegant Victorian houses.
See also: rich

stinking rich

Fig. very rich. I'd like to be stinking rich for the rest of my life. Tiffany is stinking rich, and she acts like it.
See also: rich, stinking

strike it rich

to acquire wealth suddenly. If I could strike it rich, I wouldn't have to work anymore. Sally ordered a dozen oysters and found a huge pearl in one of them. She struck it rich!
See also: rich, strike

too rich for someone's blood

 
1. too expensive for one's budget. This hotel is too rich for my blood. Europe is getting too rich for our blood.
2. too high in fat content for one's diet. This dessert is too rich for my blood. Most ice cream is too rich for my blood.
See also: blood, rich

filthy lucre

Money; originally, money obtained dishonestly. For example, She didn't like the job but loved the filthy lucre in the form of her weekly paycheck. This term comes from the Bible (Titus 1:11), where it refers to those who teach wrongly for the sake of money. In time it came to be used loosely, and usually jokingly, for money in general, and in the mid-1900s gave rise to the jocular slang term the filthy for "money." Although both versions may be dying out, the expression filthy rich, for "extremely wealthy," survives.
See also: filthy

rich as Croesus

Very wealthy, as in They're rich as Croesus, with their penthouse, yacht, and horses. This term alludes to Croesus, the legendary King of Lydia and supposedly the richest man on earth. The simile was first recorded in English in 1577.
See also: Croesus, rich

strike it rich

Also, strike oil or strike it lucky. Experience sudden financial success, as in He never dreamed that he'd strike it rich this soon, or They really struck oil with that investment, or One of these days we'll strike it lucky. The first of these idioms originated in mining, where it referred to finding a rich mineral deposit. [Colloquial; second half of 1800s]
See also: rich, strike

a bit rich

INFORMAL
If you say that someone's criticism is a bit rich, you mean that they themselves are guilty of the same fault. Gil says that women can't keep secrets. That's a bit rich, coming from him.
See also: bit, rich

rich as Croesus

BRITISH, OLD-FASHIONED
If someone is as rich as Croesus, they are very rich. He's as rich as Croesus, and getting richer all the time. Note: Croesus was the ruler of Lydia, a kingdom in Asia Minor, in the 6th century BC. He was famous for being very rich.
See also: Croesus, rich

strike it rich

If you strike it rich, you suddenly earn or win a large amount of money. He struck it rich with his first novel. Commerce seems to offer graduates more opportunities to strike it rich.
See also: rich, strike

filthy lucre

(...ˈlukɚ)
n. money. I sure could use a little of that filthy lucre.
See also: filthy

filthy rich

1. mod. very wealthy. I wouldn’t mind being filthy rich.
2. n. people who are very wealthy. The filthy rich can afford that kind of thing, but I can’t.
See also: filthy, rich

stinking rich

mod. very rich. I’d like to be stinking rich for the rest of my life.
See also: rich, stinking

strike it rich

tv. to become rich suddenly. Pete is the kind of guy who wants to strike it rich and live in the lap of luxury for the rest of his life.
See also: rich, strike

too rich for someone’s blood

1. mod. too expensive for one’s budget. Europe is getting too rich for our blood.
2. mod. too high in fat content for one’s diet. Most ice cream is too rich for my blood.
See also: blood, rich

strike it rich

Informal
To have sudden financial success.
See also: rich, strike

poor little rich girl

Unhappy heiress. In contrast to Job's turkey, the subject of this phrase wants for nothing—except emotional support. The original “poor little rich girl” was socialite Barbara Hutton, heiress to the Woolworth (“Five and Dime” stores) and E. F. Hutton investment banking fortunes. She had a lonely childhood, seven failed— and in many cases, exploitive—marriages, and died a broken (and nearly broke) woman at age sixty-six. The phrase has been applied to other women whose lives were sad in spite (or perhaps because of inherited wealth).
See also: girl, little, poor, rich

rich beyond the dream of avarice

Wealthy beyond imagination. “Avarice” means “greedy,” so to be rich beyond the dream of avarice is to have more money than even a Scrooge McDuck or Charles Montgomery Burns nocturnal fantasy. The phrase can be traced back to two 18th-century writers, the redoubtable Samuel Johnson and the lesser-known Edward Moore.
See also: beyond, dream, of, rich
References in periodicals archive ?
Combined with the short, crisply written chapter-essays, they make Narnia Beckons an irresistible page turner and a book that can be satisfyingly sampled piecemeal: just jump in at any point in the volume and you will be richly rewarded.
This Birmingham Royal Ballet production of Kenneth MacMillan's richly choreographed piece has sumptuous beauty at every turn - from costumes to drapes, from street fight scenes to the ballroom - it is all so wonderfully layered.
Written specifically for young readers ages 10 and up, these books feature an easy to read text richly illustrated with period photographs, maps, paintings, and portraits.
These case studies, richly illustrated with four-color photographs and photomicrographs, provide exemplary approaches to efficient problem analysis and problem solving.
Just as Gaines has distilled a richly nuanced vision of African American life by drawing upon a great multitude of voices and perspectives, Doyle uses a wide variety of critical tools, including formalist, historical, cultural, and feminist criticism, to provide a broad and balanced assessment of Gaines's writing.
Martl's biography offers a fascinating study of careerism in the late medieval church and is richly and intelligently documented with an impressive range of archival sources, memoirs, and analysis of the speeches of Jouffroy himself.
RICHLY DESERVED: Cardiff City striker Robert Earnshaw was last night named Jurys Cardiff/The Western Mail Sportstar of the Year.
SAVED AND RICHLY SPENT PASCAL RIOULT DANCE THEATRE THE DUKE ON 42ND STREET NEW YORK, NEW YORK JANUARY 2-7, 2001
Rose's thesis about changing ideas about mothers' work is richly argued and convincing; her grounding in local history and the case records of day nurseries complements the national policy focus of scholars like Sonya Michel.
Stopkewich dazzled audiences and critics alike with her debut, Kissed, a richly nuanced mix of black humour, morbidity and a uniquely playful portrait of a necrophiliac.
The recorded sound is well-balanced for a concert recording, perhaps a bit subdued dynamically, but certainly enjoyable, and overall this is about 110 minutes of richly rewarding jazz.
LeSeur beautifully recaptures the lives of African American, Hispanic and Native American migrant workers in the first half of the century through richly detailed interviews with their families.
Shaped by latitude, culture and place, the capacity of light to make manifest built form and move the human spirit has been a richly poetic element of architecture since the earliest times.
But other pieces, such as a reflection on Mario Puzo and the mafia, and richly drawn commentaries on Count Basie, Duke Ellington, and Billie Holiday, explore turf that is not associated with the author of classic texts such as Age of Extremes.
And then suppose - as a crowning touch - that the "tester" or her sponsors turned out to have a huge financial stake in the outcome, standing to cash in richly if a charge against him could be made to stick, and not otherwise.
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