rhyme

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Related to rhyming: Rhyming couplet

neither rhyme nor reason

No particular logic, sense, method, or meaning of a given situation, action, person, thing, group, etc. I've looked over it several times, but there's neither rhyme nor reason to the agreement we were sent this morning.
See also: neither, nor, reason, rhyme

no rhyme or reason

No particular logic, sense, method, or meaning to a given situation, action, person, thing, group, etc. I've looked over it several times, but there's no rhyme or reason to the document we were sent this morning.
See also: no, reason, rhyme

rhyme off

To quickly articulate a litany of things or recite the items of a list. When asked if we had any baby names in mind, Sarah started rhyming them off one after the other. I then rhymed off a list of things that needed to be changed or improved if the company wished to survive.
See also: off, rhyme

rhyme or reason

The particular logic, sense, method, or meaning of a given situation, action, person, thing, group, etc. (Most often used in negative formations to indicate an absence or lack thereof.) Could someone please explain to me the rhyme or reason behind the program's selection process? I've looked over it several times, but there's no rhyme or reason to the agreement we were sent this morning.
See also: reason, rhyme

rhyme with (someone or something)

1. To have the same or similar sound as another word. Almost nothing in the English language rhymes with "orange." Despite its odd spelling, "pique" rhymes with "peak."
2. To think of, speak, or write a word that has the same or similar sound as another word. I thought it was rather clever rhyming "worth" with "dearth." It's a little lazy just rhyming "town" with "town" instead of using a different word.
See also: rhyme

run rhymes

To deliver a performance of rhyming poetry or rap lyrics that one has written or thought up. A possessive pronoun can be used between "run" and "rhymes" The kids runs rhymes like a professional. I'd be shocked if we didn't see a rap album out of him in the next couple of years. She had been running her rhymes at a number of amateur poetry events before she finally got he nerve to submit her work to a publisher.
See also: rhyme, run

without rhyme or reason

Without clear or understandable logic, order, purpose, or meaning. As far as I can tell, their selection process is completely without rhyme or reason. The killer is a psychopath, John. He does things without rhyme or reason, so stop trying to figure his motives out.
See also: reason, rhyme, without
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

*neither rhyme nor reason

Cliché without logic, order, or planning. (Describes something disorganized. *Typically: be ~; have ~.) There seems to be neither rhyme nor reason to Gerald's filing system. The novel's plot had neither rhyme nor reason.
See also: neither, nor, reason, rhyme

rhyme something with something

[for someone] to make one word rhyme with another word. I need to rhyme tree with some other word. Any suggestions? Can I rhyme good with food?
See also: rhyme

rhyme with something

[for a word] to rhyme with another word. You can't use house in that line of the poem, because it doesn't rhyme with mice. The last word in your poem doesn't rhyme with any other word in the poem!
See also: rhyme

run one's rhymes

Sl. to say what you have to say; to give one's speech or make one's plea. Go run your rhymes with somebody else! I told him to run his rhymes elsewhere.
See also: rhyme, run

without rhyme or reason

Cliché without purpose, order, or reason. (See variations in the examples. Fixed order.) The teacher said my report was disorganized. My paragraphs seemed to be without rhyme or reason. Everything you do seems to be without rhyme or reason.
See also: reason, rhyme, without
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

rhyme or reason, no

An absence of common sense or reasonableness, as in This memo has no rhyme or reason. Closely related variants are without rhyme or reason, as in The conclusion of her paper was without rhyme or reason, and neither rhyme nor reason, as in Neither rhyme nor reason will explain that lawyer's objections. This term originated in French about 1475 and began to be used in English about a century later. Sir Thomas More is credited with saying of a mediocre book that a friend had put into verse, "Now it is somewhat, for now it is rhyme; whereas before it was neither rhyme nor reason."
See also: no, rhyme
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

no rhyme or reason

or

no rhyme nor reason

If there is no rhyme or reason or no rhyme nor reason for something, there seems to be no logical or obvious explanation for it. There seems no rhyme or reason behind the pricing of many of these products. I can see no rhyme nor reason for the variance in spelling. Note: You can also say that something happens without rhyme or reason. Symptoms appear and disappear apparently without rhyme or reason. Cuts are being made without rhyme or reason. The only motive is to save money to meet Treasury targets.
See also: no, reason, rhyme
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

rhyme or reason

logical explanation or reason.
See also: reason, rhyme
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

there’s no ˌrhyme or ˈreason to/for something

,

without ˌrhyme or ˈreason

no sense or logical explanation: There has been no rhyme or reason to market movements in recent weeks.Changes were being made without rhyme or reason.This phrase comes from Shakespeare’s play As You Like It: ‘But are you so much in love as your rhymes speak?’ ‘Neither rhyme nor reason can express how much’.
See also: no, reason, rhyme, something
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

run one’s rhymes

tv. to say what you have to say; to give one’s speech or make one’s plea. (Collegiate.) Go run your rhymes with somebody else!
See also: rhyme, run
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

neither rhyme nor reason

No sense whatever. This term dates from the fifteenth century, when an unknown French writer wrote, En toy ne Ryme ne Raison (“In you neither rhyme nor reason,” Maistre Pierre Pathelin, ca. 1475). Sir Thomas More is credited with the following remark made to a friend who had put into verse a mediocre book: “Yea, marry, now it is somewhat, for now it is rhyme; whereas before it was neither rhyme nor reason.” The term made it into John Ray’s proverb collection of 1678 and is by no means obsolete.
See also: neither, nor, reason, rhyme
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer

neither rhyme nor reason

Making no sense at all. “Rhyme” alludes to poetry and by extension all of the creative arts, while “reason” stands for intellect. Accordingly, something that can't be understood or justified in terms of either artistic merit or logic is indeed of little value.
See also: neither, nor, reason, rhyme
Endangered Phrases by Steven D. Price Copyright © 2011 by Steven D. Price
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
Those interested in Caplan's attention to insult rhyming may also appreciate Elijah Wald's The Dozens: A History of Rap's Mama, an intricate text that traces the tradition of verbal jousting within African American culture, and emphasizes rhyming as an influential facet.
The Onegin stanza contains seven rhyming line pairs (A, b, C, d, f, E, g), which can be shown to differ in their preference for rich vs.
Her rhyming gift isn't confined to notes on cards, however; Ms.
The first section of the essay considers a variety of Warring States texts and finds that rhyming in most of the Zhuangzi has the greatest likeness to the Lushi chunqiu [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] and Guanzi [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] "suggesting the composite nature of those texts" (p.
Keywords: rhyming; letter knowledge; early literacy; participant structures; contextualized instruction
(Edmund Burke builds his argument on the nature of the sublime partly out of noticing the effect on us of expectation and surprise, and then Coleridge generalizes that poetry's technology of poetic language, as we might say, uses surprise of local effect in poetic meter, which of course is played against the reader's expectation of regularity of scheme; so in rhyming, a rhyme word that because of its freshness surprises us plays against our expectation of knowing that a similar sound is coming.
Because most of us have those around anyway, rhyming becomes very economical.
The second edition of this beginning phonics program for grades Pre-K-1 includes a Teacher's Manual providing instructions and scripts for addressing five skill areas: listening, rhyming, segmenting, learning phoneme/ grapheme relationships and dictation.
The rhyming patterns and meter increases focus time on content by capturing a young child's attention.
Another day the students found rhyming words in the rhyme.
Neither Alphabet nor Numbers is in rhyming format, but they do offer a glimpse into the world of the toddler and his family - a voyage of discovery through messy play, visits to grandma's and parties.
Effects of combining thematic-fantasy play and activities targeting discrimination and production of rhyming words were examined.
Whereas Pulci's Italian hendecasyllabic octaves rhyme abababcc, Tusiani has chosen to approximate that form with an English blank verse sestette, followed by a rhyming or half-rhyming pentameter couplet.
The most prominent such sites were the inferior frontal gyrus, especially during nonsense word rhyming, and Broca's area, a crucial location for speech processing.
(14) (It is significant that the time-scale of rhyme development in Chinese mirrors that of European verse.) Indeed, there are instances of much earlier European uses of rhyme than De judico domini: for example, Simmias of Rhodes is credited with creating rhyming verse at about 300 bc.