rhyme

(redirected from rhymed)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to rhymed: rhymer, Nursery rhymes

neither rhyme nor reason

No particular logic, sense, method, or meaning of a given situation, action, person, thing, group, etc. I've looked over it several times, but there's neither rhyme nor reason to the agreement we were sent this morning.
See also: neither, nor, reason, rhyme

no rhyme or reason

No particular logic, sense, method, or meaning to a given situation, action, person, thing, group, etc. I've looked over it several times, but there's no rhyme or reason to the document we were sent this morning.
See also: no, reason, rhyme

rhyme off

To quickly articulate a litany of things or recite the items of a list. When asked if we had any baby names in mind, Sarah started rhyming them off one after the other. I then rhymed off a list of things that needed to be changed or improved if the company wished to survive.
See also: off, rhyme

rhyme or reason

The particular logic, sense, method, or meaning of a given situation, action, person, thing, group, etc. (Most often used in negative formations to indicate an absence or lack thereof.) Could someone please explain to me the rhyme or reason behind the program's selection process? I've looked over it several times, but there's no rhyme or reason to the agreement we were sent this morning.
See also: reason, rhyme

rhyme with (someone or something)

1. To have the same or similar sound as another word. Almost nothing in the English language rhymes with "orange." Despite its odd spelling, "pique" rhymes with "peak."
2. To think of, speak, or write a word that has the same or similar sound as another word. I thought it was rather clever rhyming "worth" with "dearth." It's a little lazy just rhyming "town" with "town" instead of using a different word.
See also: rhyme

run rhymes

To deliver a performance of rhyming poetry or rap lyrics that one has written or thought up. A possessive pronoun can be used between "run" and "rhymes" The kids runs rhymes like a professional. I'd be shocked if we didn't see a rap album out of him in the next couple of years. She had been running her rhymes at a number of amateur poetry events before she finally got he nerve to submit her work to a publisher.
See also: rhyme, run

without rhyme or reason

Without clear or understandable logic, order, purpose, or meaning. As far as I can tell, their selection process is completely without rhyme or reason. The killer is a psychopath, John. He does things without rhyme or reason, so stop trying to figure his motives out.
See also: reason, rhyme, without
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

*neither rhyme nor reason

Cliché without logic, order, or planning. (Describes something disorganized. *Typically: be ~; have ~.) There seems to be neither rhyme nor reason to Gerald's filing system. The novel's plot had neither rhyme nor reason.
See also: neither, nor, reason, rhyme

rhyme something with something

[for someone] to make one word rhyme with another word. I need to rhyme tree with some other word. Any suggestions? Can I rhyme good with food?
See also: rhyme

rhyme with something

[for a word] to rhyme with another word. You can't use house in that line of the poem, because it doesn't rhyme with mice. The last word in your poem doesn't rhyme with any other word in the poem!
See also: rhyme

run one's rhymes

Sl. to say what you have to say; to give one's speech or make one's plea. Go run your rhymes with somebody else! I told him to run his rhymes elsewhere.
See also: rhyme, run

without rhyme or reason

Cliché without purpose, order, or reason. (See variations in the examples. Fixed order.) The teacher said my report was disorganized. My paragraphs seemed to be without rhyme or reason. Everything you do seems to be without rhyme or reason.
See also: reason, rhyme, without
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

rhyme or reason, no

An absence of common sense or reasonableness, as in This memo has no rhyme or reason. Closely related variants are without rhyme or reason, as in The conclusion of her paper was without rhyme or reason, and neither rhyme nor reason, as in Neither rhyme nor reason will explain that lawyer's objections. This term originated in French about 1475 and began to be used in English about a century later. Sir Thomas More is credited with saying of a mediocre book that a friend had put into verse, "Now it is somewhat, for now it is rhyme; whereas before it was neither rhyme nor reason."
See also: no, rhyme
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

no rhyme or reason

or

no rhyme nor reason

If there is no rhyme or reason or no rhyme nor reason for something, there seems to be no logical or obvious explanation for it. There seems no rhyme or reason behind the pricing of many of these products. I can see no rhyme nor reason for the variance in spelling. Note: You can also say that something happens without rhyme or reason. Symptoms appear and disappear apparently without rhyme or reason. Cuts are being made without rhyme or reason. The only motive is to save money to meet Treasury targets.
See also: no, reason, rhyme
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

rhyme or reason

logical explanation or reason.
See also: reason, rhyme
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

there’s no ˌrhyme or ˈreason to/for something

,

without ˌrhyme or ˈreason

no sense or logical explanation: There has been no rhyme or reason to market movements in recent weeks.Changes were being made without rhyme or reason.This phrase comes from Shakespeare’s play As You Like It: ‘But are you so much in love as your rhymes speak?’ ‘Neither rhyme nor reason can express how much’.
See also: no, reason, rhyme, something
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

run one’s rhymes

tv. to say what you have to say; to give one’s speech or make one’s plea. (Collegiate.) Go run your rhymes with somebody else!
See also: rhyme, run
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

neither rhyme nor reason

No sense whatever. This term dates from the fifteenth century, when an unknown French writer wrote, En toy ne Ryme ne Raison (“In you neither rhyme nor reason,” Maistre Pierre Pathelin, ca. 1475). Sir Thomas More is credited with the following remark made to a friend who had put into verse a mediocre book: “Yea, marry, now it is somewhat, for now it is rhyme; whereas before it was neither rhyme nor reason.” The term made it into John Ray’s proverb collection of 1678 and is by no means obsolete.
See also: neither, nor, reason, rhyme
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer

neither rhyme nor reason

Making no sense at all. “Rhyme” alludes to poetry and by extension all of the creative arts, while “reason” stands for intellect. Accordingly, something that can't be understood or justified in terms of either artistic merit or logic is indeed of little value.
See also: neither, nor, reason, rhyme
Endangered Phrases by Steven D. Price Copyright © 2011 by Steven D. Price
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
In the second stage, under the pressure of linguistic changes brought about by the Conquest, narrative verse in rhymed couplets emerged.
(58) Again, it would be unwise to claim any necessary role for music in forming stanzas, since, centuries earlier, rhymed Latin verse had provided simple stanzaic forms, as lines with both internal and end-rhyme were broken in half to form end-rhymed stanzas.
This has a wealth of relevant material, but of particular interest is his emphasis on the early use of rhyme in the rhymed prose of folklore and in classical rhetorical prose (pp.
28 The small discrepancies in the tables and appendices of this study between the totals of stressed, rhymed, and alliterating words presented here and the actual number of lines and stresses are mainly due to (1) words that bear two stresses, leading to their being counted more than once, (2) the noninclusion of "Other" in the statistics on etymology, and (3) the few lines that have five lexical words (all counted as stressed).
29 Further figures in Appendix A, which separate the lexical words that participate in the end-rhyme and alliteration from those that do not, provide a more dramatic and probably more accurate measure of the effect of form on etymological origin (the 28.8 percent figure includes all stressed words, rhymed and unrhymed).
36 In the frequent alliteration of the end-line stress (rhymed), Pearl contrasts strikingly with the long-line works where the system dictates that the final stressed words of the lines (unrhymed) rarely alliterate.
Similarly, "sat" and "light" offer only a faint phonemic echo of each other, but performing a type of grammatical inversion--bringing "sat" into the present tense, while moving "light" into the past tense of its verb form--discovers "sit" and "lit," a perfectly rhymed pair.
Having examined departures from the rhymed couplet by variations in sound, we may now consider spatial deviations from this mythical norm.
In the first example, "eat" arrives exactly one foot too late to form a perfect rhymed couplet, while in the second "Lord" arrives one foot too early.
Purcell, responding to Diekhoff's study, counts 56 instances of end rhyme separated by only one line, 72 separated by two lines, and 51 separated by three.(7) Once again, this may not seem like a very significant number of rhymed lines, roughly four percent of all the lines of Paradise Lost.
That is, when words are rhymed, the reader tends to consider the possibility of some meaningful semantic as well as phonemic relationship among them.
Our expectation of semantic relationships among rhymed words also informs our reading of Paradise Lost.