rhyme


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rhyme off

To quickly articulate a litany of things or recite the items of a list. When asked if we had any baby names in mind, Sarah started rhyming them off one after the other. I then rhymed off a list of things that needed to be changed or improved if the company wished to survive.
See also: off, rhyme

rhyme or reason

The particular logic, sense, method, or meaning of a given situation, action, person, thing, group, etc. (Most often used in negative formations to indicate an absence or lack thereof.) Could someone please explain to me the rhyme or reason behind the program's selection process? I've looked over it several times, but there's no rhyme or reason to the agreement we were sent this morning.
See also: reason, rhyme

no rhyme or reason

No particular logic, sense, method, or meaning to a given situation, action, person, thing, group, etc. I've looked over it several times, but there's no rhyme or reason to the document we were sent this morning.
See also: no, reason, rhyme

neither rhyme nor reason

No particular logic, sense, method, or meaning of a given situation, action, person, thing, group, etc. I've looked over it several times, but there's neither rhyme nor reason to the agreement we were sent this morning.
See also: neither, nor, reason, rhyme

rhyme with (someone or something)

1. To have the same or similar sound as another word. Almost nothing in the English language rhymes with "orange." Despite its odd spelling, "pique" rhymes with "peak."
2. To think of, speak, or write a word that has the same or similar sound as another word. I thought it was rather clever rhyming "worth" with "dearth." It's a little lazy just rhyming "town" with "town" instead of using a different word.
See also: rhyme

run rhymes

To deliver a performance of rhyming poetry or rap lyrics that one has written or thought up. A possessive pronoun can be used between "run" and "rhymes" The kids runs rhymes like a professional. I'd be shocked if we didn't see a rap album out of him in the next couple of years. She had been running her rhymes at a number of amateur poetry events before she finally got he nerve to submit her work to a publisher.
See also: rhyme, run

*neither rhyme nor reason

Cliché without logic, order, or planning. (Describes something disorganized. *Typically: be ~; have ~.) There seems to be neither rhyme nor reason to Gerald's filing system. The novel's plot had neither rhyme nor reason.
See also: neither, nor, reason, rhyme

rhyme something with something

[for someone] to make one word rhyme with another word. I need to rhyme tree with some other word. Any suggestions? Can I rhyme good with food?
See also: rhyme

rhyme with something

[for a word] to rhyme with another word. You can't use house in that line of the poem, because it doesn't rhyme with mice. The last word in your poem doesn't rhyme with any other word in the poem!
See also: rhyme

run one's rhymes

Sl. to say what you have to say; to give one's speech or make one's plea. Go run your rhymes with somebody else! I told him to run his rhymes elsewhere.
See also: rhyme, run

without rhyme or reason

Cliché without purpose, order, or reason. (See variations in the examples. Fixed order.) The teacher said my report was disorganized. My paragraphs seemed to be without rhyme or reason. Everything you do seems to be without rhyme or reason.
See also: reason, rhyme, without

rhyme or reason, no

An absence of common sense or reasonableness, as in This memo has no rhyme or reason. Closely related variants are without rhyme or reason, as in The conclusion of her paper was without rhyme or reason, and neither rhyme nor reason, as in Neither rhyme nor reason will explain that lawyer's objections. This term originated in French about 1475 and began to be used in English about a century later. Sir Thomas More is credited with saying of a mediocre book that a friend had put into verse, "Now it is somewhat, for now it is rhyme; whereas before it was neither rhyme nor reason."
See also: no, rhyme

no rhyme or reason

or

no rhyme nor reason

If there is no rhyme or reason or no rhyme nor reason for something, there seems to be no logical or obvious explanation for it. There seems no rhyme or reason behind the pricing of many of these products. I can see no rhyme nor reason for the variance in spelling. Note: You can also say that something happens without rhyme or reason. Symptoms appear and disappear apparently without rhyme or reason. Cuts are being made without rhyme or reason. The only motive is to save money to meet Treasury targets.
See also: no, reason, rhyme

rhyme or reason

logical explanation or reason.
See also: reason, rhyme

there’s no ˌrhyme or ˈreason to/for something

,

without ˌrhyme or ˈreason

no sense or logical explanation: There has been no rhyme or reason to market movements in recent weeks.Changes were being made without rhyme or reason.This phrase comes from Shakespeare’s play As You Like It: ‘But are you so much in love as your rhymes speak?’ ‘Neither rhyme nor reason can express how much’.
See also: no, reason, rhyme, something

run one’s rhymes

tv. to say what you have to say; to give one’s speech or make one’s plea. (Collegiate.) Go run your rhymes with somebody else!
See also: rhyme, run

neither rhyme nor reason

No sense whatever. This term dates from the fifteenth century, when an unknown French writer wrote, En toy ne Ryme ne Raison (“In you neither rhyme nor reason,” Maistre Pierre Pathelin, ca. 1475). Sir Thomas More is credited with the following remark made to a friend who had put into verse a mediocre book: “Yea, marry, now it is somewhat, for now it is rhyme; whereas before it was neither rhyme nor reason.” The term made it into John Ray’s proverb collection of 1678 and is by no means obsolete.
See also: neither, nor, reason, rhyme

neither rhyme nor reason

Making no sense at all. “Rhyme” alludes to poetry and by extension all of the creative arts, while “reason” stands for intellect. Accordingly, something that can't be understood or justified in terms of either artistic merit or logic is indeed of little value.
See also: neither, nor, reason, rhyme
References in periodicals archive ?
"I think its important that we keep nursery rhymes going and encourage young children to learn them." Ann, who took on the role of Quilter in Residence at Alzheimer Scotland, has been busy sewing memory quilts and inspiring people all over the world to get stitching for the dementia charity.
Rhyme was charged with possession of a stolen firearm, police said.
He said: "I love rhyming and I love the silliness of it - News at Len, Mime the Rhyme. I like doing rhymes myself.
We acknowledge that the severity of the plan and the rich and copious recurrence of the rhyme serve the double end of repelling the incompetent workman and stimulating the competent, (p.
3) Two words with a different number of syllables rhyme only if the longer has the same rhythm in its terminal syllable/s as that of all the syllables of the shorter.
In an introduction that begins with the all-caps assertion "WE LIVE IN A RHYME DRENCHED era," Caplan demonstrates how rhymes abound in popular music, and indeed many facets of modern American life, referring to what he calls "contemporary rhyming culture" (1).
Russian versification, by and large, inherits the French attitude toward rhyme, with its more stringent expectations and a regular alternation between "masculine" (stress on the ultimate syllable) and "feminine" (stress on the penultimate syllable) line endings.
The Essential Daryl Hine is just that -- essential -- as a reminder that rhyme is a tool best not forgotten by modern poets.
Gathered by noted author Katherine Govier, Half for You and Half for Me is a collection of traditional and modern rhymes, a collection rich in her memory of hearing them on her mother's lap and rich in her belief that the rhymes are to share.
In this article, a rhyme is understood as a morphophonological item consisting of multiple phonemes within a morpheme: nucleus + coda or unstressed consonant in the second syllable + unstressed vowel in the second syllable.
Rhyme also belongs to the expressive forms of poetry; through its relation to the whole, rhyme becomes an important element of a text's poetic style and thereby achieves its special status and meaning in the system of its linguistic means of expression.
That's become something she's famous for in her family: Everyone looks forward to a card from her - with a little rhyme as well.
On that list were several nursery rhyme books and many of what might be called the classics.
Everybody was worried that it might mess up the integrity of Bet but I was like, '(As) long as he got a dope rhyme, let him spit'," Contactmusic quoted him as saying.
TELECOMWORLDWIRE-September 20, 2011-HTC unveils HTC Rhyme phone, introduced exclusively with Verizon Wireless(C)1994-2011 M2 COMMUNICATIONS http://www.m2.com