rhyme


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rhyme off

To quickly articulate a litany of things or recite the items of a list. When asked if we had any baby names in mind, Sarah started rhyming them off one after the other. I then rhymed off a list of things that needed to be changed or improved if the company wished to survive.
See also: off, rhyme

rhyme or reason

The particular logic, sense, method, or meaning of a given situation, action, person, thing, group, etc. (Most often used in negative formations to indicate an absence or lack thereof.) Could someone please explain to me the rhyme or reason behind the program's selection process? I've looked over it several times, but there's no rhyme or reason to the agreement we were sent this morning.
See also: reason, rhyme

no rhyme or reason

No particular logic, sense, method, or meaning to a given situation, action, person, thing, group, etc. I've looked over it several times, but there's no rhyme or reason to the document we were sent this morning.
See also: no, reason, rhyme

neither rhyme nor reason

No particular logic, sense, method, or meaning of a given situation, action, person, thing, group, etc. I've looked over it several times, but there's neither rhyme nor reason to the agreement we were sent this morning.
See also: neither, nor, reason, rhyme

*neither rhyme nor reason

Cliché without logic, order, or planning. (Describes something disorganized. *Typically: be ~; have ~.) There seems to be neither rhyme nor reason to Gerald's filing system. The novel's plot had neither rhyme nor reason.
See also: neither, nor, reason, rhyme

rhyme something with something

[for someone] to make one word rhyme with another word. I need to rhyme tree with some other word. Any suggestions? Can I rhyme good with food?
See also: rhyme

rhyme with something

[for a word] to rhyme with another word. You can't use house in that line of the poem, because it doesn't rhyme with mice. The last word in your poem doesn't rhyme with any other word in the poem!
See also: rhyme

run one's rhymes

Sl. to say what you have to say; to give one's speech or make one's plea. Go run your rhymes with somebody else! I told him to run his rhymes elsewhere.
See also: rhyme, run

without rhyme or reason

Cliché without purpose, order, or reason. (See variations in the examples. Fixed order.) The teacher said my report was disorganized. My paragraphs seemed to be without rhyme or reason. Everything you do seems to be without rhyme or reason.
See also: reason, rhyme, without

rhyme or reason, no

An absence of common sense or reasonableness, as in This memo has no rhyme or reason. Closely related variants are without rhyme or reason, as in The conclusion of her paper was without rhyme or reason, and neither rhyme nor reason, as in Neither rhyme nor reason will explain that lawyer's objections. This term originated in French about 1475 and began to be used in English about a century later. Sir Thomas More is credited with saying of a mediocre book that a friend had put into verse, "Now it is somewhat, for now it is rhyme; whereas before it was neither rhyme nor reason."
See also: no, rhyme

no rhyme or reason

or

no rhyme nor reason

If there is no rhyme or reason or no rhyme nor reason for something, there seems to be no logical or obvious explanation for it. There seems no rhyme or reason behind the pricing of many of these products. I can see no rhyme nor reason for the variance in spelling. Note: You can also say that something happens without rhyme or reason. Symptoms appear and disappear apparently without rhyme or reason. Cuts are being made without rhyme or reason. The only motive is to save money to meet Treasury targets.
See also: no, reason, rhyme

rhyme or reason

logical explanation or reason.
See also: reason, rhyme

there’s no ˌrhyme or ˈreason to/for something

,

without ˌrhyme or ˈreason

no sense or logical explanation: There has been no rhyme or reason to market movements in recent weeks.Changes were being made without rhyme or reason.This phrase comes from Shakespeare’s play As You Like It: ‘But are you so much in love as your rhymes speak?’ ‘Neither rhyme nor reason can express how much’.
See also: no, reason, rhyme, something

run one’s rhymes

tv. to say what you have to say; to give one’s speech or make one’s plea. (Collegiate.) Go run your rhymes with somebody else!
See also: rhyme, run

neither rhyme nor reason

Making no sense at all. “Rhyme” alludes to poetry and by extension all of the creative arts, while “reason” stands for intellect. Accordingly, something that can't be understood or justified in terms of either artistic merit or logic is indeed of little value.
See also: neither, nor, reason, rhyme
References in periodicals archive ?
I conclude by showing that Swinburne's Century was an argument in Victorian debates about whether rhyme was solely a sonic medium or could operate as a visual medium as well.
To rhyme well, wittily, inventively, and confidently is to promise sexual mastery" (85).
In general, when there is a rhyme, we also find a stanza, ranging from a couplet, or pair of lines (rimes plates in the alexandrine), to longer and highly unorthodox sequences, which can be as long as twenty-nine lines, as in one of Voltaire's odes "To de Richelieu" (AbAbAAbbCCbC ddCeCeCeCeeCfCCfC).
Rhyming patterns sometimes reveal themselves only after being read aloud, and Hine has plenty of tricks and odd patterns to keep the rhymes from becoming predictable.
Generously interspersed among the rhymes are illustrator Sarah Clement's full-page, bold, full-coloured illustrations and smaller, mostly sepia-toned traditional illustrations selected from the Osborne Collection of Early Children's Books (Toronto Public Library).
This broad conception allows us to pursue the phonetic processes of "canonization" and "decanonization" (kanonizacija i dekanon-izacija) of pure rhyme in its historical course.
Available in Clearwater, Hourglass and Plum colours, the HTC Rhyme comes with a 5-megapixel camera and its locked home screen can be customised to display the content most important to the user.
Consider, for instance, Shakespeare's "Sonnet 55" where the aural rhyme doesn't exclude further associative connotations:
ItAAEs nicknamed AoWorm CityAo, and Fred Rhyme is its mayor.
Only 36% of the parents surveyed regularly read nursery rhymes with their children, while almost a quarter admitted to having never sung a nursery rhyme with their child.
His first day there, Rhyme is visited by Jim Bell, sheriff of Paquenoke County, where two women have been kidnapped and a young man killed by 16-year-old Garrett Hanlon, nicknamed the Insect Boy because of his interest in bugs.
This collection of rhyme and verse is beautifully accompanied by the simple, attractively coloured illustrations and page layout.