red meat rhetoric

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red meat rhetoric

Rhetoric used by campaigning politicians that is forceful and poignant, as will excite or inflame their supporters. The incumbent president, who has so far been somewhat lackluster this campaign delivered a blistering speech last night filled with red meat rhetoric.
See also: meat, red
References in periodicals archive ?
The articles in this special section illustrate the power of mass media and political language in shaping perceptions and manufacturing ideologies via deliberative and epideictic rhetoric.
These statements assume North Korea's inflammatory rhetoric means something; however, if the rhetoric fits no behavioral pattern, then other countries' populations, media, and governments should discount the insults, threats, and crisis-mongering emanating from Pyongyang.
For example, what about the anti-colonialist rhetoric that springs from earlier experiences in Algeria and Tunisia that still affects French Muslim youths?
For years, the study of rhetoric has been overlooked.
James Arnt Aune and Enrique Rigsby, Civil Rights Rhetoric and the American President (College Station, TX: Texas A&M University Press, 2005).
Comparatively Speaking: Gender and Rhetoric addresses both the theory and history of rhetoric.
As the art of persuasion, rhetoric has always had a practical orientation, aimed at helping would-be rhetors find the best available means of persuasion in any particular case, but this pragmatism inevitably intertwines with theoretical speculation about the operations of language and thought.
Arguably the greatest and most influential teacher of rhetoric was Aristotle.
Marshall interprets the whole oeuvre of Giambattista Vico (1668-1744), professor of rhetoric at the University of Naples, with great erudition and invention.
This Article joins the critical conversation on the Great Recession and the role of law and economics in this crisis by examining neoclassical and contemporary law and economics from the perspective of legal rhetoric.
Peter Mack's A History of Renaissance Rhetoric 1380-1620 presents a detailed account of the rhetorics published during the mentioned dates.
Organizational Rhetoric offers a response to the "flippant use of rhetoric as a label," as well as alternative views that "depict rhetoric as a set of complex processes through which people construct distinctive views of reality, persuade others to share their beliefs and values, and create distinctive social, political, and economic structures that are legitimized through strategic discourse" (p.
In The Reagan Rhetoric: History and Memory in 1980s America, Toby Glenn Bates justifies his study because "not a single scholar who focused exclusively on Reagan's rhetoric approached the subject as a historian" (p.
This story, recorded by Herodotus and later by Plutarch, sets out the paradoxical relation between bia and peitho, violence and rhetoric.
Unlike Robert Danisch's earlier work on the topic, Pragmatism, Democracy, and the Necessity of Rhetoric (University of South Carolina Press 2007), Crick's project focuses almost exclusively on the rhetorical resources found in John Dewey's pragmatist philosophy.