rhapsodize


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rhapsodize over (someone or something)

To speak or write about someone or something with extravagant, unbridled enthusiasm. John won't stop rhapsodizing over the book he's reading at the moment. I nearly makes me not want to read it! Janet's previous employers rhapsodized over her in their reference letter, so I'm pretty confident we're making a good decision.
See also: over, rhapsodize

rhapsodize over someone or something

to go on and on about the virtues of someone or something. Young Thomas likes to rhapsodize over Francine, his girlfriend. Please do not rhapsodize over this poem anymore.
See also: over, rhapsodize
References in periodicals archive ?
Artistic director Jacqueline Russell rhapsodizes about the chance to transform a room that recently held exhibits about King Tut and Darwin into a chandelier-adorned puppet theatre.
With its piano introduction, "Perfectly Flawed" starts out slow and gradually gains momentum, rising in a graceful arc as Shamaya rhapsodizes romantically about individuality.
In one tell-tale example, Levine rhapsodizes that the giant ads in Times Square should be replaced with "children's art, artists' videos, recipes, and safe-sex comics."
In contrast, Airmet's "Two Nights / One Moon" rhapsodizes the effects of nature on two lovers:
"But to say that no such dichotomy existed until these terms were coined is to sit on the dictionary and expect it to function as a magic carpet." The Foucaultian idea that homosexuality began in 1870--an idea "which effectively devalues all gay experience before the advent of psychiatry," he maintains--"has been a Trojan horse of homophobia." Of Johann Joachim Winckelmann, whose exegeses on Greek art fueled the Classical revival, Robb rhapsodizes: "Winckelmann was a hero of the modern mind and the modern world, and his 'unnatural' desires were the clues of a civilization that had been awaiting rediscovery for over 2,000 years." It's fine to notice differences between disparate times and cultures, but it's just bad science to annihilate the similarities.
Smith rhapsodizes about Teresa Weatherspoon: "Strong gusts of wind begin when cornrow-shaped clouds spin and form as T-Spoon steps on court to perform...." Lisa Leslie: "Graceful gazelle gallops and glides/ fast past defenders with effortless strides." The book includes 10 other poems, illustrated with action-filled photographs and eye-popping graphics.
What's more, he even rhapsodizes about the car in contemporary American culture: "We are still passionate about the automobile.
A Dan Quayle strikes heroic postures against easy targets like Murphy Brown, without acknowledging that he is attacking a pure manifestation of the market that he rhapsodizes on other days.
She rhapsodizes, as she always has, about that order of beautiful nobodies known as supermodels, a cult of which she is herself an ordained priestess.
As an example of Kotkin's atavism (to use a suitably Victorian term), he rhapsodizes about the British and American imperial era:
As one connoisseur rhapsodizes, "It's always time for coffee."
But the plot is hard to follow, for the text is hardly what you'd call "composed"; instead, its lipstick is smeared, its hair a mess, its mascara running as the nameless narrator rhapsodizes over love's joys and desolations.
She rhapsodizes about purple kale -- "it's so beautiful I want to make a suit of it and wear it around" -- and warns about "full-blown kitchen meltdown" when she runs out of sesame seeds.
My friend GR rhapsodizes that he and his colleagues "are thrilled" that LBC Express, your old reliable substitute for the post office, has developed LBC 360 to lend its logistical support to businesses that are eager to move into new and broader markets.
In a fairly well-executed caricature turn, Bernal's Victor rhapsodizes about fabricating the perfect noodle as he meets with suppliers, attends wine auctions and hunts down 300-year-old recipes across Italia.