reward (someone, something, or oneself) for (something)

(redirected from rewarding themselves for)

reward (someone, something, or oneself) for (something)

To bestow a gift, prize, bonus, treat, etc., upon someone, oneself, some animal, or group as a result of worthy behavior or actions. Often used in passive constructions. It's important to reward children for good behavior and give as little attention as possible to bad behavior. I'm going to reward myself for getting an A in all my subjects with a new video game this weekend. The company is being rewarded for its consumer-friendly business model, with thousands of people switching to their services as a result.
See also: for, reward
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

reward someone for something

to give someone a prize or a bonus for doing something. I would like to reward you for your honesty. She wanted to reward herself for her hard work, so she treated herself to a massage.
See also: for, reward
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
They have been rewarding themselves for failure, they have ignored all the obvious signs of a degrading society 'because they could, and they thought they could get away with it.' The main problems of society today come from those at the top and those at the bottom.
"People who rely on willpower alone are much less likely to succeed than those who try other techniques like telling their friends, rewarding themselves for making progress and removing temptation from their surroundings.
"We have seen a dramatic increase in the number of members enjoying the benefits of rewarding themselves for their everyday shopping.
And last night, the chief executive and other bosses were accused of rewarding themselves for failure.
'You don't need a huge amount to save or invest so lucky bonus recipients should try to find a healthy balance between rewarding themselves for a year of hard work and squirrelling their cash away.'
So great that senior management have devised a novel way of rewarding themselves for slashing budgets and making staff redundant.