reward

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desert and reward seldom keep company

proverb One will often not receive an anticipated reward. Don't get too hopeful that the teacher will recognize your hard work because desert and reward seldom keep company.

go to (one's) reward

euphemism To die. I was very sorry to hear that your grandfather went to his reward last night.
See also: go, reward

reap the rewards

To enjoy the benefits of something. You'll always reap the rewards of hard work—don't ever forget that. He was ultimately fined for the dodgy deal, which had seen his company reap the rewards of large-scale investments without any tax burden.
See also: reap, reward

reward (someone, something, or oneself) for (something)

To bestow a gift, prize, bonus, treat, etc., upon someone, oneself, some animal, or group as a result of worthy behavior or actions. Often used in passive constructions. It's important to reward children for good behavior and give as little attention as possible to bad behavior. I'm going to reward myself for getting an A in all my subjects with a new video game this weekend. The company is being rewarded for its consumer-friendly business model, with thousands of people switching to their services as a result.
See also: reward

reward (someone, something, or oneself) with (something)

To bestow a particular gift, prize, bonus, treat, etc., upon someone, oneself, some animal, or group (as a result of worthy behavior or actions). Often used in passive constructions. I try to reward my kids with berries and other sweet fruits instead of chocolates or candies I'm so pleased with my final exam results that I'm going to reward myself with a day at the spa. The company's new consumer-friendly business strategy is being rewarded with a huge surge of new business.
See also: reward

virtue is her own reward

proverb Doing something because it is morally or ethically correct should be more important and satisfying than receiving some kind of tangible reward for doing so. More commonly written as "virtue is its own reward" in modern English. A: "I went through all that trouble to find her missing dog, and all she gave me was a homemade cookie!" B: "Ah well, virtue is her own reward." No, thank you, I couldn't possibly accept that—virtue is her own reward, and I wouldn't feel comfortable taking money from you for what I did.
See also: own, reward, virtue

virtue is its own reward

proverb Doing something because it is morally or ethically correct should be more important and satisfying than receiving some kind of tangible reward for doing so. A: "I went through all that trouble to find her missing dog, and all she gave me was a homemade cookie!" B: " Ah well, virtue is its own reward." No, thank you, I couldn't possibly accept that—virtue is its own reward, and I wouldn't feel comfortable taking money from you for what I did.
See also: own, reward, virtue
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

Desert and reward seldom keep company.

Prov. If you deserve a reward, you are not necessarily going to get it. Jill: I worked so hard on that project, and Fred is taking all the credit for it. Jane: You know how it goes; desert and reward seldom keep company.

get one's just deserts

 and get one's just reward(s); get one's
[specified by context] to get what one deserves. I feel better now that Jane got her just deserts. She really insulted me. The criminal who was sent to prison got his just rewards. You'll get yours!
See also: desert, get, just

go to one's (just) reward

Euph. to die. Let us pray for our departed sister, who has gone to her just reward. Bill: How's your grandma these days? Tom: She went to her reward last winter, may she rest in peace.
See also: go, reward

reward someone for something

to give someone a prize or a bonus for doing something. I would like to reward you for your honesty. She wanted to reward herself for her hard work, so she treated herself to a massage.
See also: reward

reward someone with something

to honor someone with a gift of something. She rewarded the helpful child with a chocolate chip cookie. He rewarded himself with a night on the town.
See also: reward

Virtue is its own reward.

Prov. You should not be virtuous in hopes of getting a reward, but because it makes you feel good to be virtuous. Bill: If I help you, will you pay me? Fred: Virtue is its own reward.
See also: own, reward, virtue
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

go to your reward

die.
This euphemisistic expression is based on the idea that people receive their just deserts after death.
See also: go, reward
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

ˌvirtue is its own reˈward

(saying) the reward for acting in a moral or correct way is the knowledge that you have done so, and you should not expect more than this, for example praise from other people or payment
See also: own, reward, virtue
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017
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References in periodicals archive ?
Hebrews 11 contains this challenge "But without faith it is impossible to please Him, for he who comes to God must believe that He is and that He is a rewarder of those who diligently seek Him."
[yet,] whether we can account for it or no (which indeed we cannot in a thousand cases) we must absolutely maintain, that God is a rewarder of them that diligently seek him.
Haven't you read from scriptures that God is an 'exceeding great reward' and also a rewarder of them who diligently seek him?
"But, without faith, it is impossible to please God' for he that comes to God must believe that He is, and that He is a rewarder of them that diligently seek Him."
Hebrews 11:6, KJV But without faith it is impossible to please him: for he that cometh to God must believe that he is, and that he is a rewarder of them that diligently seek him.
God, the rewarder of good deeds will surely reward your labour of love for the APC.
A review of Reverend (Engr) Emmanuel Olusesan Adebajo's autobiography, The Rewarder.
Instead of emphasizing the team dynamics, workers tend to go rogue, outshine colleagues and even bootlick in an attempt to earn the recognition of the 'rewarders' of loyalty and service in the organization.
Rewarders are similar to comforters, but instead of masking uncomfortable feelings with treats, rewarders dole out sugar to celebrate every success and happy moment.