reward (someone, something, or oneself) with (something)

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reward (someone, something, or oneself) with (something)

To bestow a particular gift, prize, bonus, treat, etc., upon someone, oneself, some animal, or group (as a result of worthy behavior or actions). Often used in passive constructions. I try to reward my kids with berries and other sweet fruits instead of chocolates or candies I'm so pleased with my final exam results that I'm going to reward myself with a day at the spa. The company's new consumer-friendly business strategy is being rewarded with a huge surge of new business.
See also: reward
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

reward someone with something

to honor someone with a gift of something. She rewarded the helpful child with a chocolate chip cookie. He rewarded himself with a night on the town.
See also: reward
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Reward one, for the company, means that any Mice/group booking made at a UAE hotel are rewarded with a credit voucher redeemable at that same hotel from the second quarter 2016 onwards in.
NBK credit cardholders of Visa, MasterCard and Diners Club are rewarded with up to 20 percent of their purchases in the form of rewards points which they can later exchange for rewards vouchers and use in participating outlets to buy goods and services, it said.
The reward package had previously been extremely attractive to employees and those being recruited, as the 27-fold increase in the stock price between 1992 and 1999 meant lucrative gains for employees who were being rewarded with company stock.
A talented senior team member who wants to return to graduate school could be rewarded with a flexible schedule.
Physicians whose scores were greater than one SD above the norm (the 87th percentile) were rewarded with a small lump sum incentive.
If you are like most people, you push it over and over again because this behavior was previously rewarded with the elevator's arrival.
However, a single experiment (Burns, Ziropadja, Djuric, 1984), using sated rats, gave the only good evidence of SuNCE in rats rewarded with sucrose.