reward (someone, something, or oneself) with (something)

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reward (someone, something, or oneself) with (something)

To bestow a particular gift, prize, bonus, treat, etc., upon someone, oneself, some animal, or group (as a result of worthy behavior or actions). Often used in passive constructions. I try to reward my kids with berries and other sweet fruits instead of chocolates or candies I'm so pleased with my final exam results that I'm going to reward myself with a day at the spa. The company's new consumer-friendly business strategy is being rewarded with a huge surge of new business.
See also: reward
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

reward someone with something

to honor someone with a gift of something. She rewarded the helpful child with a chocolate chip cookie. He rewarded himself with a night on the town.
See also: reward
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
"It's fantastic that the scholarship this year is looking to reward someone with a fresh and innovative food or drink business idea and we look forward to helping them on their exciting journey with FSB membership and business advice."
"You reward someone with money, it just goes into the bank account and gets used for paying bills," Jacobs said.
Another example: if you reward someone with a percentage of revenues, do not be surprised if there is suddenly pressure on margins.
NOW is the time to act if you want to reward someone with a festive hamper of goodies in time for Christmas.