reward (someone, something, or oneself) for (something)

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reward (someone, something, or oneself) for (something)

To bestow a gift, prize, bonus, treat, etc., upon someone, oneself, some animal, or group as a result of worthy behavior or actions. Often used in passive constructions. It's important to reward children for good behavior and give as little attention as possible to bad behavior. I'm going to reward myself for getting an A in all my subjects with a new video game this weekend. The company is being rewarded for its consumer-friendly business model, with thousands of people switching to their services as a result.
See also: reward
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

reward someone for something

to give someone a prize or a bonus for doing something. I would like to reward you for your honesty. She wanted to reward herself for her hard work, so she treated herself to a massage.
See also: reward
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
For instance, a supervisor can reward someone for desired actions.
They don't reward someone for being smart, for those who got by and made the most of some one else's hard work.
There are many ways to reward someone for a job well done, although most of us have passed the age when receiving a gold star is enough motivation to do our best.
We're looking to reward someone for their hard graft and enthusiasm, and we want bosses, colleagues and clients to nominate drivers.
The phrase describes how - year in, year out - the Academy Awards fails to reward someone for some truly amazing piece of work, only to then chuck one of those little gold, bald gongs at them the following year out of pure sympathy.
I find I like having the opportunity to reward someone for doing a good job.
Regardless of what we do about it, though, one of the most thoroughly researched findings in social psychology is that the more you reward someone for doing something, the less interest that person will tend to have in whatever he or she was rewarded to do.
Typically, these executives oversee both leasing and operations, as it is virtually impossible to reward someone for the profitability of a real estate portfolio if that individual has no control over leasing decisions.
Labour MSP Dr Elaine Murray added: "We have to think of the general perception that public money is being used to reward someone for anti-social conduct."