revolving door

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Related to revolving-door: Revolving door syndrome

revolving door

A cycle in which employees do not remain in a position for more than a short amount of time before they leave, thus requiring the position to be filled frequently. Likened to a revolving door in front of a building where people can come and go at the same time. Primarily heard in US. Because public sector jobs typically cannot pay as much as private sector jobs, many positions become revolving doors.
See also: door, revolve

the revolving door

1. If you talk about the revolving door of an organization, you mean that the people working in it do not stay there for very long. The revolving door at Wests has only just stopped spinning. A huge turnover of players is usually not the ideal basis for success. For the next 25 years, the company had a revolving door of executives. Note: You can also use revolving-door before a noun. High spending by the country's revolving-door governments swelled the public sector debt.
2. If you talk about the revolving door between two organizations, you mean that people often move from one to the other, and sometimes back again. Mr Smith also spoke of the revolving door for senior civil servants getting jobs in industry connected with their former department. No fewer than 25 aldermen have been convicted of corruption since 1973. In fact, the revolving door between City Hall and jail accounts in part for the Mayor's current political influence.
3. You can use the revolving door to refer to a situation where solutions to problems only last for a short time, and then the same problems occur again. These kids are caught in the revolving door of the justice system, ending up back on the streets after serving time, faced with their old life. Note: You can also use revolving-door before a noun. This is the revolving-door syndrome: no home, no job, no money; hence crime, increasing isolation from society, imprisonment; hence no home on release, and back again to prison.
See also: door, revolve
References in periodicals archive ?
Given how extensively the revolving door has become intertwined with the modern regulatory state, recognizing revolving-door regulators' market-expansion incentive has the potential to change the conventional ways of thinking about a wide range of policy issues, including agency aggrandizement, overenforcement versus underenforcement, regulatory settlements, compliance monitors, private rights of action, and professional responsibility.
In the revolving-door context, however, this capture narrative has not been fully borne out by empirical evidence.
98) These concerns notwithstanding, revolving-door regulators' potential market-expansion incentive has yet to be recognized as a structural force inherent in the regulatory process.
While the literature has not systematically examined the market-expansion incentive in the revolving-door context, it has long recognized regulators' financial interests in public law enforcement and regulation in general.
The market-expansion theory of the revolving door extends this line of analysis to the revolving-door context.
122) When regulators are responsive to financial incentives, as revolving-door regulators arguably are, the depth of the financial resources of the enforcement targets becomes an important factor in determining where to focus their enforcement efforts.
First, to the extent that regulators are motivated by revolving-door considerations, they may have incentives to expand the jurisdictions of their agencies by expanding the scope of the subject matter covered by the rules they make.
Second, revolving-door regulators may also have incentives to make flexible standards as opposed to bright-line rules.
The overall objective of this exploratory study was to provide a more complete understanding of the perceptions of members of state boards of public accountancy regarding the impact that the revolving-door phenomenon has on independence.
Section A of the questionnaire contained six statements about CPA firms' independence, three general statements, and three about the revolving-door phenomenon.
Section B of the questionnaire contained six scenarios involving the revolving-door phenomenon.
The demographic information indicates that the respondents possessed the characteristics necessary to make informed judgments on independence issues impacted by the revolving-door phenomenon.
Research question 1 addressed perceptions regarding independence and the revolving-door phenomenon: "In general, what are the perceptions of members of state boards of accountancy regarding CPA firms' independence and the revolving-door phenomenon of nonpublic audit clients employing their current CPA firms' former auditors in accounting positions?
The last three statements in Section A depicted the revolving-door phenomenon of audit clients' hiring former auditors for various generic supervisory and non-supervisory accounting positions.
One-way repeated measure ANOVA results from statements 4, 5, and 6 collectively suggest that members of state boards of accountancy perceive that the ranks of the positions involved in the revolving-door phenomenon do influence perceptions of independence.