revolt

(redirected from revolts)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

revolt against (someone or something)

1. To rise up in rebellion against some person or group of authority; to attempt to overthrow the leader of a country or its government. After years of despotic rule, the citizens finally united as one to revolt against the tyrannical dictator. A number of countries have begun revolting against the empire.
2. To stand up against or defiantly reject someone or something. Large businesses across the country have been revolting against the new corporation tax, which has sent the country's economy into a tailspin. Workers are revolting against the cut to their pensions.
3. To refuse to work correctly for someone or something. As my motor neuron disease progressed, my body began revolting against me. I wore contacts for nearly 20 years with no issue, until one day my eyes simply revolted against me. Now I can't wear them without them a great deal of painful irritation.
See also: revolt

revolted by (someone or something)

Feeling intense and shocked disgust, repugnance, or offense because of someone or something. We were revolted by the squalor within the refugee camps. I always remember being revolted by my great-grandmother at the time because of her sickly, aged body and smelly, scary room. I was revolted by the thought of having to spend my weekend working.
See also: by, revolt

revolted at (someone or something)

Feeling intense and shocked disgust, repugnance, or offense because of someone or something. We were revolted at the squalor within the refugee camps. I always remember being revolted at my great-grandmother at the time because of her sickly, aged body and smelly, scary room. I was revolted at the thought of having to spend my weekend working.
See also: revolt

revolt against someone or something

to rebel or rise against someone or something. The citizens were gathering arms, preparing to revolt against the government.
See also: revolt

revolted at someone or something

sickened by someone or something. I was revolted at Frank and his behavior. We were all revolted at the scene of the bloody highway accident.
See also: revolt
References in periodicals archive ?
As Oostindie acknowledges in the first chapter, the slave revolt of 1795 connects past and present and is central in the modern-day Curagaoan discourse on nation-building.
(53) Herbert Aptheker, American Negro Slave Revolts (New York: International Publishers, 1969), 314.
This process, to which we call 'Revolt Effect', normally in the following step [DELTA]t = 100 leads to the destruction of the involved system.
Urbainczyk does not, for example, discuss the military aspects of the revolts. How did a Spartacus collect the proper intelligence gathering necessary to hold the entire Roman Republic at bay for two years?
In the last two chapters, Cohn focuses primarily on the Black Death, the long-held point of departure among medievalists for the study of revolts. Here he offers his final corrective and, perhaps, most provocative conclusion.
Fiscal abuse was arguably the primary cause for popular political upheaval; many other urban riots and revolts, on the other hand, centred on demands for protection from violence and corruption, or pursued the recognition of minor guilds or the granting of full citizenship.
Unlike the other Andean rebellions of the 1780s, the Tomas Katari revolt mainly resulted in attacks here and there, not massive warfare.
It's now well known that Africans sometimes violently resisted enslavement by Europeans, but historians have focused almost entirely on slave revolts in the Americas.
In her book The Slumbering Volcano: American Slave Ship Revolts and the Production of Rebellious Masculinity, Sale sets out to account for and explain this paradox and the illogical but powerful discourses of national identity that made such a system possible.
Principal wars: Egyptian Revolts (668-667, 663); eight wars with Elam (southwestern Iran) (667-642?); Civil War (652-648).
This anthology combines political analysis by prominent scholars of the Middle East and North Africa with essays on culture and political economy in sections on country and regional studies, society and culture, and some repercussion to the Arab revolts. The topics include the Arab citizens' revolt and the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, protesters of the Palestinian youth social movement, reflections of Arab women's leadership and activism in the Arab citizens' revolt, the Moroccan Spring and King Mohammad VI's economic policy agenda: evaluating the first dozen years, street art and the Tunisian revolt, rumor and conspiracy theory in Tahrir Square, and the Arab (and European) revolts and Occupy Wall Street.
Who abolished slavery?; slave revolts and abolitionism; a debate with Joao Pedro Marques.
He has explored marginal groups and populations in various parts of later medieval Europe, the social effects of the Black Death, and peasant revolts in Tuscany.
It was in the mountains that the architects of the Florentine regional state met their most strenuous opposition to expansion in the form of peasant revolts and widespread population movements.
And these two forces are also crucial to understanding the author's social typology of revolts, which he divides into popular protests against local oligarchs and quarrels between factional rivals for power, the latter conflicts intensified by the increasing and somewhat confused royal ingress into urban politics.