revolt

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Related to revolting: notoriety

revolt against (someone or something)

1. To rise up in rebellion against some person or group of authority; to attempt to overthrow the leader of a country or its government. After years of despotic rule, the citizens finally united as one to revolt against the tyrannical dictator. A number of countries have begun revolting against the empire.
2. To stand up against or defiantly reject someone or something. Large businesses across the country have been revolting against the new corporation tax, which has sent the country's economy into a tailspin. Workers are revolting against the cut to their pensions.
3. To refuse to work correctly for someone or something. As my motor neuron disease progressed, my body began revolting against me. I wore contacts for nearly 20 years with no issue, until one day my eyes simply revolted against me. Now I can't wear them without them a great deal of painful irritation.
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revolted at (someone or something)

Feeling intense and shocked disgust, repugnance, or offense because of someone or something. We were revolted at the squalor within the refugee camps. I always remember being revolted at my great-grandmother at the time because of her sickly, aged body and smelly, scary room. I was revolted at the thought of having to spend my weekend working.
See also: revolt

revolted by (someone or something)

Feeling intense and shocked disgust, repugnance, or offense because of someone or something. We were revolted by the squalor within the refugee camps. I always remember being revolted by my great-grandmother at the time because of her sickly, aged body and smelly, scary room. I was revolted by the thought of having to spend my weekend working.
See also: by, revolt
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

revolt against someone or something

to rebel or rise against someone or something. The citizens were gathering arms, preparing to revolt against the government.
See also: revolt

revolted at someone or something

sickened by someone or something. I was revolted at Frank and his behavior. We were all revolted at the scene of the bloody highway accident.
See also: revolt
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
After that, a bloody civil war broke out, so I strongly advise Frank Lampard and friends to forget about this revolting idea very quickly.
He added: "Older people have been paying taxes all their lives and in the twilight of their lives they are fed some revolting food for a few quid a day."
The gathering, organized by the Women's Studies Department, was creatively tided "Revolting Behavior: The Challenges of Women's Sexual Freedom;' and eventually led to an attempt to oust the college president, Roger W.
While "Revolting Behavior" featured advocacy of lesbian S&M (and what critics contend was unabashed "recruitment" by its practitioners), de Russy rightly noted that "if male faculty members had invited male recruiters from heterosexual-sadomasochism groups to campus to promote participation by female college students," an outcry would have been sure to follow.
Milton employs this sense in Eikonoklastes, where he writes of the Parliamentarian General Sir John Hotham 'revolting to the King'.(8) This instance is of interest because it shows Milton playing one sense of 'revolt' off against another.
He might play on the other sense, since Faustus's revolting to Lucifer will confirm his revolting from God.
This revolting comic book for students--revolting in its tortuous graphic and typographical design, revolting in its charmless foreigners' English, revolting in its gratuitous pornographic imagery, and revolting in much else besides must surely mark a low point in Rem Koolhaas's relentless campaign of self-promotion.