reverse

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Related to reversing: Reversing Falls

go into reverse

To move backward or in the opposite direction. I just worry that our store's sales will go into reverse once everyone reads that terrible review.
See also: go, reverse

put (something) into reverse

To cause something to move backward or in the opposite direction. I just worry that that terrible review will put our store's sales into reverse.
See also: put, reverse

in reverse

1. Of an automobile, having the gear enabled that will allow it to be driven backward. Put it in reverse and then back up very slowly.
2. Backwards; in or facing the opposite direction; in the opposite order or position. Can be used as either an adjective or an adverb. Stop putting my books in reverse when you're cleaning! They're supposed to go A to Z, not Z to A! I think his password is just his birthday in reverse. Did you know that your shirt is in reverse? Your tag is sticking out at the back.
See also: reverse

the reverse of the medal

The opposite, contrary, or differing point of view about or aspect of something. Freelance writers have much greater flexibility in their schedule, as well as in the content they create; the reverse of the medal, of course, is that they rarely have anything resembling job security.
See also: medal, of, reverse

reverse (one's) course

1. To stop and begin moving in the opposite direction. The quarterback tried reversing his course to evade the defensive linesmen, but he wasn't quick enough and ended up getting sacked in the end zone. As soon as we saw the family of bears, we quietly and hastily reversed course.
2. To suddenly hold or profess a position or opinion that runs contrary or opposite to one held previously. The senator seemed to reverse course the following day, stating that he would never condone police violence against any citizen. The city's legal team spent months convincing the judge to reverse her course and allow the case to proceed.
See also: course, reverse

reverse (one's) field

1. To stop and begin moving in the opposite direction. Said especially of athletes on the field during gameplay. The quarterback tried reversing his field to evade the defensive linesmen, but he wasn't quick enough and ended up getting sacked in the end zone. As soon as we saw the family of bears, we quietly and hastily reversed field.
2. To suddenly hold or profess a position or opinion that runs contrary or opposite to one held previously. The senator seemed to reverse field the following day, stating that he would never condone police violence against any citizen. The city's legal team spent months convincing the judge to reverse her field and allow the case to proceed.
See also: field, reverse

reverse gears

To quickly and often abruptly reverse or retreat from one's position or opinion on a given subject. Refers to shifting into reverse on car or other motor vehicle. The administration is reversing gears on its controversial tax policy, which has come as a surprise to many. Instead of reversing gears, the company has been doubling down on what has been an unprofitable business strategy for many others around the country.
See also: gear, reverse

put some reverse English on it

1. To strike or throw a ball with a spin that will keep it from moving in particular direction. You'll never get the ball into the pocket that way! Put some reverse English on it!
2. To speak in a manner, often related to syntax, that confuses the listener. No wonder he got so confused, with you putting some reverse English on it like that.
See also: English, on, put, reverse

the reverse of the medal (or shield)

the opposite view of a matter.
See also: medal, of, reverse

go/put something into reˈverse

start to happen or make something happen in the opposite way: In the 1980s economic growth went into reverse.
See also: go, put, reverse, something

in reˈverse

in the opposite order or way; backwards: The secret number is my phone number in reverse.We did a similar trip to you, but in reverse.
See also: reverse

reverse gears

tv. to wretch as a prelude to vomiting; to vomit the stomach contents. Beavis is reversing gears and might be going to vomit. You never know with Beavis.
See also: gear, reverse

reverse (one's) field

To turn and proceed in the opposite direction.
See also: field, reverse
References in periodicals archive ?
Yesterday workers held a meeting with their managers to try to clarify the rules and regulations surrounding safety when reversing their trucks.
"An accusation has been made that one of our drivers did not use a reversing assistant on Friday and as a result he and his assistant were suspended pending an investigation," he said.
But it has been clarified and they now know they all have to have a reversing assistant to reverse."
He said the union would continue to look into the suspensions but added it was pursuing a case of one of their members who earlier this year was dismissed from his job for reversing his bin lorry into a quiet side street despite having a 20-year history of good service.
Reversing the direction of the merger (i.e., merging X into T) eliminates these problems.
Instead, Olson found that by reversing the field at just the right rate, he could even stop the motion of particular molecules.