reverse

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Related to reversed: reverse osmosis, reserved

go into reverse

To move backward or in the opposite direction. I just worry that our store's sales will go into reverse once everyone reads that terrible review.
See also: go, reverse

put (something) into reverse

To cause something to move backward or in the opposite direction. I just worry that that terrible review will put our store's sales into reverse.
See also: put, reverse

in reverse

1. Of an automobile, having the gear enabled that will allow it to be driven backward. Put it in reverse and then back up very slowly.
2. Backwards; in or facing the opposite direction; in the opposite order or position. Can be used as either an adjective or an adverb. Stop putting my books in reverse when you're cleaning! They're supposed to go A to Z, not Z to A! I think his password is just his birthday in reverse. Did you know that your shirt is in reverse? Your tag is sticking out at the back.
See also: reverse

the reverse of the medal

The opposite, contrary, or differing point of view about or aspect of something. Freelance writers have much greater flexibility in their schedule, as well as in the content they create; the reverse of the medal, of course, is that they rarely have anything resembling job security.
See also: medal, of, reverse

reverse (one's) course

1. To stop and begin moving in the opposite direction. The quarterback tried reversing his course to evade the defensive linesmen, but he wasn't quick enough and ended up getting sacked in the end zone. As soon as we saw the family of bears, we quietly and hastily reversed course.
2. To suddenly hold or profess a position or opinion that runs contrary or opposite to one held previously. The senator seemed to reverse course the following day, stating that he would never condone police violence against any citizen. The city's legal team spent months convincing the judge to reverse her course and allow the case to proceed.
See also: course, reverse

reverse (one's) field

1. To stop and begin moving in the opposite direction. Said especially of athletes on the field during gameplay. The quarterback tried reversing his field to evade the defensive linesmen, but he wasn't quick enough and ended up getting sacked in the end zone. As soon as we saw the family of bears, we quietly and hastily reversed field.
2. To suddenly hold or profess a position or opinion that runs contrary or opposite to one held previously. The senator seemed to reverse field the following day, stating that he would never condone police violence against any citizen. The city's legal team spent months convincing the judge to reverse her field and allow the case to proceed.
See also: field, reverse

reverse gears

To quickly and often abruptly reverse or retreat from one's position or opinion on a given subject. Refers to shifting into reverse on car or other motor vehicle. The administration is reversing gears on its controversial tax policy, which has come as a surprise to many. Instead of reversing gears, the company has been doubling down on what has been an unprofitable business strategy for many others around the country.
See also: gear, reverse

the reverse of the medal (or shield)

the opposite view of a matter.
See also: medal, of, reverse

go/put something into reˈverse

start to happen or make something happen in the opposite way: In the 1980s economic growth went into reverse.
See also: go, put, reverse, something

in reˈverse

in the opposite order or way; backwards: The secret number is my phone number in reverse.We did a similar trip to you, but in reverse.
See also: reverse

reverse gears

tv. to wretch as a prelude to vomiting; to vomit the stomach contents. Beavis is reversing gears and might be going to vomit. You never know with Beavis.
See also: gear, reverse

reverse (one's) field

To turn and proceed in the opposite direction.
See also: field, reverse
References in periodicals archive ?
On the first issue, discussion centered on whether a write-down of nonmonetary assets (for example, fixed assets or identifiable intangibles) to net realizable value should be reversed. EITF Issue no.
If the new estimate supports a higher value, the write-down should be reversed and accounted for as a change in estimate in accordance with APB Opinion no.
The reporting period when the decision to discontinue operations is reversed would include results of operations of the segment in continuing operations.
The Court of Appeals then reversed the Appellate Division.
The trial court affirmed the determination of the Zoning Board of Appeals, but the Appellate Division, Second Department, reversed, finding that the determination was not supported by substantial evidence.
On further appeal, the Court of Appeals reversed the Appellate Division, stating that "local zoning boards have broad discretion in considering applications for variances, and judicial review is limited to determining whether the action taken by the board was illegal, arbitrary or an abuse of discretion (citation omitted.) Thus, a.
That wedge has to reform when the electric field is reversed. Caught by such a reversal, some molecules react more quickly than others.
This neat trick caused all sorts of trouble for geoscientists, who were at the time debating the seemingly unlikely notion that the earth's magnetic field periodically reversed direction.