reverberate

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Related to reverberator: reverbs

reverberate through (something or some place)

Of a sound, to fill and resound through something or some place in a series of loud echoes. The singer's booming voice reverberated through the dance hall. The sound of gunshots has been reverberating through the war-torn city for weeks.
See also: reverberate, through

reverberate throughout (something or some place)

Of a sound, to fill and resound throughout something or some place in a series of loud echoes. The singer's booming voice reverberated throughout the dance hall. The sound of gunshots has been reverberating throughout the war-torn city for weeks.

reverberate with (something)

To be filled with the resounding echoes of some loud sound. The dance hall reverberated with the music of the rock-and-roll band. The war-torn city reverberated with the sound of gunshots.
See also: reverberate

reverberate through something

[for sound] to roll through or pass through a space. The thunder reverberated through the valley. The sound of the organ reverberated through the church.
See also: reverberate, through

reverberate throughout something

[for sound] to roll about and fill a space. The thunder reverberated throughout the valley. The noise of chairs scraping the floor reverberated throughout the room.

reverberate with something

to echo or resound with something. The hall reverberated with the rich basso voice of Walter Rogers. The church reverberated with the roar of the pipe organ.
See also: reverberate
References in periodicals archive ?
72) George Knox, "Reverberations and He Reverberator," Essex Institute Historical Collections 95 (October 1959): 353.
Watch and Ward, 1871; Roderick Hudson, 1875; The American, 1877; The American, 1907 [1877]; The Europeans, 1878; Daisy Miller, 1878; Daisy Miller, 1909 [1878]; Confidence, 1880; Washington Square, 1881 ; The Portrait of a Lady, 1881 ; The Portrait o[ a Lady, 1908 [1881]; The Bostonians, 1886; The Princess Casamassima, 1886; The Reverberator, 1908 [1888]; The Tragic Muse, 1890; The Spoils of Poynton, 1897; What Maisie Knew, 1908 [1897]; The Awkward Age, 1899; The Sacred Fount, 1901; The Wings of the Dove, 1909 [1902]; The Ambassadors, 1909 [1903]; The Golden Bowl, 1909 [1904]; The Ivory Tower, 1917
Salmon's most innovative and illuminating reading comes in chapter 4, "The Power of the Press, From Scandal to Hunger," which examines The Reverberator (1887) and "The Papers" (1903) from the standpoint of the new journalism of the 1880s and 1890s.
Two novels, The Reverberator and The Bostonians, are dominated by the machinery of publicity, and The Tragic Muse is dominated by the struggle between publicity and privacy.
How can we accept the argument that the Probert sisters in The Reverberator are modelled (unflatteringly) on a Pilon sculpture, when that sculpture is introduced as an image for their attractive adversary, Francie?
The second and third chapters read Henry James's The Reverberator and The Sacred Fount as crucial texts in the creation of a new kind of audience for literature and the training of that audience in new forms of literary competence.