reverberate

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Related to reverberator: reverbs

reverberate through (something or some place)

Of a sound, to fill and resound through something or some place in a series of loud echoes. The singer's booming voice reverberated through the dance hall. The sound of gunshots has been reverberating through the war-torn city for weeks.
See also: reverberate, through

reverberate throughout (something or some place)

Of a sound, to fill and resound throughout something or some place in a series of loud echoes. The singer's booming voice reverberated throughout the dance hall. The sound of gunshots has been reverberating throughout the war-torn city for weeks.

reverberate with (something)

To be filled with the resounding echoes of some loud sound. The dance hall reverberated with the music of the rock-and-roll band. The war-torn city reverberated with the sound of gunshots.
See also: reverberate
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

reverberate through something

[for sound] to roll through or pass through a space. The thunder reverberated through the valley. The sound of the organ reverberated through the church.
See also: reverberate, through

reverberate throughout something

[for sound] to roll about and fill a space. The thunder reverberated throughout the valley. The noise of chairs scraping the floor reverberated throughout the room.

reverberate with something

to echo or resound with something. The hall reverberated with the rich basso voice of Walter Rogers. The church reverberated with the roar of the pipe organ.
See also: reverberate
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The New York editions of The American, The Portrait of a Lady, and The Reverberator are assigned to their original periods of publication except in one analysis in which The Portrait of a Lady is identified as intermediate.
How can we accept the argument that the Probert sisters in The Reverberator are modelled (unflatteringly) on a Pilon sculpture, when that sculpture is introduced as an image for their attractive adversary, Francie?
The second and third chapters read Henry James's The Reverberator and The Sacred Fount as crucial texts in the creation of a new kind of audience for literature and the training of that audience in new forms of literary competence.
X 8 letters: ARAUCANA, EYEPIECE, SYSTASIS 9 letters: ATHABASKA, CONCYCLIC EBENACEAE, GONGAGENG, HACHSHISH, OGBOMOSHO, SUSPENSES 10 letters: ANATHEMATA, EVERYWHERE, SYSTEMISES 11 letters: ANAMNIONATA, ELEAGNACEAE, HEATHTHRUSH, KNICKAKNOCK, YMAGYNYNGLY 12 letters: ACCIACCATURA (cham), EVIDENCEABLE, LIGULIFLORAL (cham), REVERBERATOR, SYSTEMATISES 13 letters: EXPERGISCENCE, PIMPERLIMPIMP, READER-PRINTER, WINDOWSWALLOW 14 letters: ACANTHOCEPHALA, ELECTROPHORESE, THROSTLE-THROAT 15 letters: SERORESISTANCES 16 letters: ABRACHIOCEPHALIA (sted), SINISTROTORSIONS (sted) 17 letters: TRANSIT-INSTRUMENT 18 letters: EMPLOYMENT-EXCHANGE (b) Pattern X ?
as it controls the morphology of a story." Allowing herself more space than usual, she comes up with a number of valuable analogies and insights: how, for example, James's reference to sculptors Jean Goujon and Germain Pilon reveals his American heroine in The Reverberator to be more genuine aristocrat than the snobbish Gallicized family she marries into; how Lord Mellifont, the (usually maligned) character in "The Private Life" modelled on Lord Leighton, is the "real hero of the story" and, further, how Leighton's paintings are subtly reflected in the tale's descriptions; or how Holbein's painting The Ambassadors may have supplied James with the title, and helped reinforce the theme (momento mori and carpe diem), of one of his greatest works.
Attack of the creationist reverberators! Or: The end of the world (as we know it).