revenge (oneself) (up)on (someone or something)

(redirected from revenged upon)

revenge (oneself) (up)on (someone or something)

To retaliate against another for a wrong done to oneself; to seek or exact revenge against someone. Tiffany is always gossiping about me, so I revenged myself on her by starting a nasty rumor about her relationship with one of our teachers. I see the growth of this extremist movement as largely being citizens revenging themselves upon the established government, which they feel has betrayed or abandoned them.
See also: revenge

revenge oneself (up)on someone or something

to retaliate against someone or something. (Upon is formal and less commonly used than on.) There is no need for you to revenge yourself upon Walter. It was an accident. She did not know how she would revenge herself on Joe, but she knew she would.
See also: on, revenge
References in classic literature ?
For three days the old man had brooded over his grievance, seeking for some means to be revenged upon the King for the insult which Henry had put upon him.
The Nome King could not forgive Dorothy or Princess Ozma, and he had determined to be revenged upon them.
Hooja still harbored ill will against me because of the blow I had struck in Dian's protection, and his malevolent spirit was equal to sacrificing us all that he might be revenged upon me.
Here he found a hand-hold, quickly righted himself, and as quickly clambered upward to be revenged upon Tarzan, but the ape-man was otherwise engaged and did not wish to be interrupted.
So now the Jew lays a trap for Antonio, hoping to catch him and be revenged upon his enemy.
No, fool, there is a better way--a better way for Solan to keep thy money and be revenged upon Salensus Oll."
"I cannot understand why you came to my rescue in the first place, and now I cannot understand why, having me within your power, you do not wish to be revenged upon me for having sentenced you to death--for having almost put you to death with my own hand."
The prosecution of several Irish people in Upperhead Row for lodging house offences in 1850 led to 'a determination to be revenged upon the police force for having brought them before the magistrates.'.